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Just thought a thread that everyone could contribute their wheeling knowledge would be beneficial for everyone out there. Obviously learning by seat of the pants is best, however some simple tips of how to overcome obstacles would be great! Or post up anything that would help out first timers such as what to bring on wheeling trips, vehicle maintenance or trail laws like who goes first when crossing paths.. Go ahead get posting!!

Put the subject of your wheeling tip in the subject line and explain in detail what you know or learned about that subject below.
 

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When going down hill in Sand or Loose Terrain..

I learned that when going down hill in loose terrain the vehicle will tend to slide one way or the other....

To correct steering and not get sideways and roll..... You should turn the wheel into the direction of the slide. It feels weird but will keep you going straight!! :beer:
 

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steep climbs

Don't freak out when doing your first steep climb. It will feel like the Jeep is about to come over backwards. It won't unless you're doing something stupid. Again, listen to your experienced spotter.

Keeping up your momentum is key. This will help in almost all climbs. Steady as she goes.
 
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Best advice for a beginner is to go with an experienced group the first couple of times. They will have all the tools and recovery gear and virtually every wheeler I’ve ever met enjoys helping beginners out with spotting or recovery (even though they maybe be laughing at you and taking pictures :innocent:). You will be shocked what you can do if you trust an experienced spotter.

Second piece of advice is regarding recovery. Try not to let anyone get pictures of another brand of vehicle strapping you :grinpimp:
 

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X2 on AlexW's comment. Also, It seems obvious but keep your freaking limbs inside your vehicle. I've seen some close calls recently.
 

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X2 on AlexW's comment. Also, It seems obvious but keep your freaking limbs inside your vehicle. I've seen some close calls recently.
My first time wheeling in Moab, I learned a lot in the first 2 minutes.
First, slickrock is not slick. You don't floor it to make it up a climb. You want to crawl.
Second, when the Jeep begins to slip sideways on said climb, you can not stop it from rolling by sticking your arm and leg out of the jeep (luckily, I broke the jeep before I rolled).
Third, it is a real good idea to ride with someone your first time out and see how they do it.
Fourth, changing out broken hubs and bolts in the Super 8 parking lot is not too difficult.

Some other advice:
Lean your right foot against the transmission tunnel. When the jeep begins to bounce, your foot is against something stationary and not bouncing on the gas pedal.
Follow right behind someone who is a good driver that is not too crazy. Take their line.
If there are multiple obstacles, look ahead at the next couple of obstacles, not the one you are on or about to do. You want to be set up before you get to them.

peter
 

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as far as what to bring. i always have a good firstaid kit, along with a few recovery straps, and a gallon of water.
 

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my best advice. Go with a group of people you trust who have been doing this awhile. Learn from them, talk to them, get them to spot you, follow their lines and when going remember if their Jeep didnt flip over doing the line, yours probably wont either...

As far as packing, pack like you cant rely on anyone else. I pack food, water, recovery stuff, tools, extra fluids, ect even if other people are bringing them. Better safe than sorry
 

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Drive as slow as possible, but as fast as necessary

I think the old credo of, "Drive as slow as possible, but as fast as necessary" makes good sense, especially when it comes to rocks.
 

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Here is one or two tips

When rockcrawling with a automatic and attempting say a waterfall. Power brake the jeep using both feet and move forward by letting off the brake. This will prevent the lunge affect in autos and if you don't have lockers this will help apply torque to all wheels.

Also if climbing a waterfall with a ledge and crawling up it doesn't work (always try to crawl something first) a little bump is okay. Your spotter will tell you when to bump. Just don't get hopping because that is how you break stuff. Don't know haw many times that has happened to stupid people. :D
 

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Don't go alone and when you're in a group, make sure everyone understands the concept of trail buddies. The vehicle in front is responsible to keep the one behind in their rear view. It's a real PITA to lose the vehicle in front and turn wrong or to get stuck and wait until someone decides to come looking for you. It's amazing the number of "good" trail drivers who have way too much testosterone to drive with anyone else.
 

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When on a trail and you are with a group of jeepers and you come to a hill its best to go one at a time....

Ain't that right Prope.....haha
 

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When on a trail and you are with a group of jeepers and you come to a hill its best to go one at a time....

Ain't that right Prope.....haha
:laughing2: The pictures coming to my mind right now.:laughing2:
:jeep1:
:jeep1:
:jeep1:
:jeep1:
:jeep1:
:cruiser2:
 

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This may not be acceptable for a forum, but here goes.

Get training from a certified 4X4 trainer! The cost of a professional training is a lot cheaper then the smallest repair, because you were learning by the seat of your pants. I run into people who are experienced and say they know what they are doing to watch them tear up the vehicle or the terrain. Just because someone has been 4-wheeling for years dose not mean the are doing it correctly.

Frenchie La Chance
www.4westernadventures.com
 

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Lockers

Lockers are great for going forward, but they don't like to turn. That is why selectable lockers are great. Some times you need to turn them off to make a tight turn.
 

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This may not be acceptable for a forum, but here goes.

Get training from a certified 4X4 trainer! The cost of a professional training is a lot cheaper then the smallest repair, because you were learning by the seat of your pants. I run into people who are experienced and say they know what they are doing to watch them tear up the vehicle or the terrain. Just because someone has been 4-wheeling for years dose not mean the are doing it correctly.

Frenchie La Chance
www.4westernadventures.com
If you are going to pimp your services you need to get a yellow star.
 

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If you are climbing an obstacle and you begin to go over backwards don't hit the brake. Throw the Jeep in reverse and calmly get on the gas, never hit the brakes until you have regained control up upward momentum.

Tire pressure is a major factor in tackling a lot of trails. Make sure for rocks and sand that you air down at the beginning of a trail and not when the front of your jeep is under two feet of water on some slick rock. Seriously airing down make a much larger contact patch and allows the tires to float i sand and grab rock when you are climbing.

Tie down loose items in your Jeep. You don't need to be in the middle of a technical down hill obstacle just to have something come flying from the back of the Jeep and hitting you in the head. Or even worse if you roll some of that stuff has the potential to kill.

Know how to fix your own Jeep. Most Jeepers can wrench and if you cant make sure someone with you knows how before getting out on the middle of a trail

Maintain you vehicle. If you know you have a tendency of breaking a specific item, carry spares. If you have something almost broken don't hit the trail thinking it will last cause it wont and more than likely it will take other parts along with it when it fails.
 

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The hardest one for me to learn:

When going down a steep incline and the truck wants to come over itself the braKe is the last thing you want to slam on, learn to react and hit the gas.

A buddy of mine learned this the hardway:

Deep (above the frame) water crossings should be traversed at an angle to, and with the current, use the water to help you across.

When wheeling under 3 vehicles make sure you have enough supplies to hike out on foot. I learned this the hard way, our second truck broke on the way out to get repair parts for the first.
 
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