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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm having a hell of a time getting my wheels to mount up front. The rears were fine. When I go to put the wheel on the axle, you can see that some of the studs are ever-so-slightly off and the tolerance is too tight to fit my (lug centric) wheel. My plan was to remove the studs, check to make sure they were straight and re-install (or replace). The issue is, they are most likely set with red loctite and I cannot get them to back out. They are pressed in.

Any thoughts on how to proceed? I tried doing the double nut routine (one open lug nut with another tightened on top, then loosten using the inner nut. They both just spin. I'm wondering if it is safe to apply heat to the studs. I really don't want to pull the caliper and all that crap if I don't have to.
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Heat to melt the red, acetone, methyl chloride, or more red locktight. The solvent will soften the cured stuff. Just don't use heat when the solvents are present.

They burn real good.
 

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I am not understanding something here. Are you removing the wheel stud from a spacer? I have never seen a wheel stud that was not pressed in from the rear. A lot of times removing the caliper will give you space to drive them out and install new ones. Those look like new studs-are you sure they are seated against the wheel hub?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I thought they were threaded, they are pressed in. From what I can tell they appear to be pressed against the hub. When I put a square against them, a few are off a little.
Wondering if I could wrap a ratcheting strap around the outside of the wheel / tire and ratchet it onto the mounting surface. I just worry I could put myself in a position where later on it could be difficult to remove.
 

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On the back side of the wheel hub are the studs seated up tight all the way? If not you can seat them by using a spare lug nut and a stack of washers. You will need enough washers to give you room to pull the stud into position. Put the washers lubed with the grease or anti-seize on the stud next to the hub and tighten the nut to seat the studs. If the studs still won't fit the tire, I would say you have a bad hub or rim. I have never heard of that though. Try swapping the rear which you know work to the front and see if they do.
 

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Looking again at your picture, I see that all the wheel studs seem to be to the inside of the rim holes. There seems to be a space to the outside of the studs all the way around. I assume, and we all know what that means, this is an eight-lug kit you are installing. Are you sure they are the correct rims for that hub? The bolt patten doesn't look quite right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
NOTE: Updated title thread to better-explain issue.

The photo makes it hard to see, but long story short:
  • The hub is 8x6.5 (I've measures between studs that are squared with the mounting surface. I also panicked and thought "oh shit 8xmetric!" - however, we are good there.
  • a few of the studs are just not square
  • The amount of "out of square" + length of stud + size of stud (9/16") basically means that the "unthreaded" part of the stud will fit in the holes. The threads take it past the tolerance of the lug hole. Not sure if that makes sense.

Right now my assumptions are in this order:
  • a few studs are just not seated fully (more on that in a sec)
  • at some point, someone handle the axle by a stud and it moved / bent

Fusion pointed me to this neat little tool you use that pulls the stud through the flange using a lugnut. I had never honestly seen one of these tools before, so I realized I was just overthinking stuff. I'm going to hit them with the tool + impact and see if it straightens them out. My guess is it will be easy-peasy and I learned something new (which is cool).

Heres's the tool.

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The torque spec on aluminum wheel not that much, as seen here, it may not be enough to seat studs. When I changed a stud on my Wrangler, it took quite a bit of wrenching to seat it properly.
Next time don't use you rim as a spacer, use the tool above or washers as I stated above that. I would hate to see you damage the seating area of your aluminum rim.
 

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Glad you got it worked out. Don't you have a press? When I've done this in the past, I used a press to press out the studs and press new ones back in but you do need to take the hub apart. The Lisle tool looks good. Might have to pick one of those up because I want to replace all of my lug studs on the front axle with longer studs.

Fusion axles look a lot like ECGS (East Coast Gear Supply) axles. ;) There are some folks out here that wonder if Fusion actually builds their own axles. Dan is pretty cool, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Glad you got it worked out. Don't you have a press? When I've done this in the past, I used a press to press out the studs and press new ones back in but you do need to take the hub apart. The Lisle tool looks good. Might have to pick one of those up because I want to replace all of my lug studs on the front axle with longer studs.

Fusion axles look a lot like ECGS (East Coast Gear Supply) axles. ;) There are some folks out here that wonder if Fusion actually builds their own axles. Dan is pretty cool, though.
I have a press -- I absolutely did not want to tear everything apart, and honestly, I shouldn't have to. I get that a stack of washers is probably fine, not that I have a 2" stack of 9/16 washers laying around. I just spent the $40 on the tool and moved on. The nice thing is the tool will work with anything including a full size truck.

I like Lisle tools. I always feel like they are the right balance between quality and affordable. I see a lot of Lisle tools on the Snappy trucks.

Dan is very cool. Very knowledgeable. Very available. Fusion support is awesome. All great reasons to deal with them. I have no complaints otherwise. Having a quick fix for the studs is one of those "it is what it is" kinda things.
As for the Fusion / ECGS thing, kinda reminds me of how Synergy used to act like PP was different. Maybe on paper. Maybe on mailing address. But yeah. whatever - I just don't care at this point. I heard a rumor Yukon bought ECGS. I guess you can always brag you have a Yukon axle now. I think that qualifies for plus 20 cool guy points :p
 

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Glad you got it worked out. Don't you have a press? When I've done this in the past, I used a press to press out the studs and press new ones back in but you do need to take the hub apart. The Lisle tool looks good. Might have to pick one of those up because I want to replace all of my lug studs on the front axle with longer studs.

Fusion axles look a lot like ECGS (East Coast Gear Supply) axles. ;) There are some folks out here that wonder if Fusion actually builds their own axles. Dan is pretty cool, though.
Replacing studs in situ is easy as 1-2-3. Absolutely no need to take things apart.

Just get some penetrating oil and cold spray, they'll pop right out with a couple of hammer taps.
 

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This was my setup for pulling the stud in place:
That is how I have always done it. I just lubed the washers and used an impact gun to tighten the nut.
+3 Washers and hammered them on with a gun.

Honestly, if you aren't the first owner of said studs I'd replace them all (or the whole hub)
No telling how many times they've been over torqued in their life.
 
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