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· RIP Brad
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Question to all on trail repairs, if you carry a welder.

What are you carrying and why? Do you like your investment? What have you welded on the trail and how was the results?

Currently, my club has a member with a Ready Welder and one with a Premier Welder.

The Ready Welder stays in camp, so it is useless for trail repairs and usually, we have several full sized welding machines back at camp. If we break on trail and cannot get the vehicle out, we'll send someone back to camp and get the welder. Not a good solution... and not sure why the welder isn't taken on the trail by it's owner? This system works well from what I have seen, but a slight PITA to setup. http://readywelder.com/

The Premier Welder is located under the hood.... this system seems to work pretty well. Easy and fast to setup, with most of the equipment being stored under hood. Battery charger and 110v power outlet are just damn cool (and fairly necessary... you want to use that grinder, right?)! Drawback is the cost of this system. http://www.premierpowerwelder.com/

And this one that I came upon... The Metal Mender. This is put out by the same guy that is doing the Audio Interrupt in my rig. It is by far, the cheapest in this group. It is pretty limited in only being able to do stick and while it's pretty bare bones, I think it might be a great investment for quick trail repairs to get back to camp where the real machines live. http://www.anzaproducts.com/#!metal-mender/cfs9



Any that I missed?

Comments and suggestions?
 

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I use a ready welded. Reasons why because its a mig and I hate stick welding. Ive repaired everything front axle side trackbar brackets, tie rods, frame side trackbar brackets and so on. I don't run two batteries because that's gay and I don't have room for one so I just pull up another jeep in the group for the second battery. You can use one battery if you have to but its a pretty cold weld.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I717 using Tapatalk 2
 

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Welder

I don't run a welder but in my honest opinion dual batteries one mounted side by side with the welder that is within budget because I know it's a pain in the rear to have to wait on the repair rig to run down to camp hitch up the welder that at least an hour or two of lost wheel time or drinking time
 

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you only need 20-23 volts for welding mild steel usually. So the 2 batteries in series will suffice.

experience
My pitman arm snapped in half in Isham Canyon New Years day 2010. We couldn't get the pitman arm off the steering box so we had to weld it back together in place. In other words upside down, and vertical welding.
Someone suggested we stitch it and then lay gussets over all sides. We cut up an old U bolt into 3 pieces and welded it to the pitman arm across the fracture. About an hour later, lunch, clean up etc. I got out of the notch canyon, finished the run, headed back to camp, hooked up my little off road trailer and drove 200 miles home.

I laughed when I loaded into my jeep that day because I didn't really know how to weld. Something told me it would be a good thing to bring. It was in my inventory and it needed to be demonstrated, for me, by me. I'm glad I brought it. Now I own it.

and you ask what welder did I use.

READY WELDER and 2 yellow top optimas in series-- it's no joke.
The cast iron pitman was glowing red hot in the middle of the day. It wasn't good for the steering box so it got replaced as well.

I made it home with Ready Welder 10000
http://readywelder.com/products-page/welders/10000-2

caused a traffic jam in the canyon




I'll try and get a picture of the pitman arm later this week and post it
 

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Wow, everyone's getting all bent outta shape about 2 batteries...

abendx, you're forgetting the ultra simplistic trail repair welder, 3 sets of jumper cables, 3 batteries ties in series, and some stick electrodes.
http://www.jpmagazine.com/techarticles/trail/154_1010_trail_welding_tips/viewall.html
This...

you only need 20-23 volts for welding mild steel usually. So the 2 batteries in series will suffice.

experience
My pitman arm snapped in half in Isham Canyon New Years day 2010. We couldn't get the pitman arm off the steering box so we had to weld it back together in place. In other words upside down, and vertical welding.
Someone suggested we stitch it and then lay gussets over all sides. We cut up an old U bolt into 3 pieces and welded it to the pitman arm across the fracture. About an hour later, lunch, clean up etc. I got out of the notch canyon, finished the run, headed back to camp, hooked up my little off road trailer and drove 200 miles home.

I laughed when I loaded into my jeep that day because I didn't really know how to weld. Something told me it would be a good thing to bring. It was in my inventory and it needed to be demonstrated, for me, by me. I'm glad I brought it. Now I own it.

and you ask what welder did I use.

READY WELDER and 2 yellow top optimas in series-- it's no joke.
The cast iron pitman was glowing red hot in the middle of the day. It wasn't good for the steering box so it got replaced as well.

I made it home with Ready Welder 10000
http://readywelder.com/products-page/welders/10000-2

caused a traffic jam in the canyon




I'll try and get a picture of the pitman arm later this week and post it
Did you try taking it off at this point? Seems like it would have came off then. :lol:
 

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I am the guy with the Readywelder that Abendx referenced. But what he didn't tell you, is that I ALWAYS take it on all trails that are far from the tow rig. The one run I didn't take it on, and needed it, was only 15 minutes from camp. Its actually pretty small and easy to transport, and who wouldn't want a spool gun for trail repairs! It is fully adjustable for different metal thickness and burns nice and hot. Use the Lincoln Flux core wire (the only flux core worth buying) and its a great tool.

I have used it many times already. I completely ripped my TF long arm mounts off the frame rail and spun the front axle on the Coyote Lake trail, and my Readywelder got me home. I repaired 2 shock mounts and a trackbar mount for other JKowners on my last Rubicon trip. I welded the tie rod back together on my son's TJ on Swamp Lake. These are all very remote trails and having a Welder saved the trip. On top of that, folks borrow it at camp all the time to fix shit, especially when the XJ guys are ripping steering boxes off the frame rails :mad:

I looked into the Premier power welder before I bought my welder because the one on my dad's old CJ was pretty cool. But the premier unit was frying JK electronics, messing up idle control, and generally creating havoc with the computer. So They were not recommending them for the JK at the time. Rumor has it that they fixed the issue last year and sell one for the JK now. But it is over twice the cost of a Readywelder, and is still just a stick welder. But, the advantage is that you do not need two batteries and it isn't taking up space in your cargo area.

Or do like Goatman does: Carry some 6010 rods in a protective tube and 2 sets of Jumper cables. collect 3-4 pairs of sunglasses from the group, and weld away. I have seen him do it in Ridgecrest and it actually burned in pretty good.
 

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This...



Did you try taking it off at this point? Seems like it would have came off then. :lol:
:bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:



It's not the only time I've used, but 1st and the most memorable.
You know at that point it was done. :gluging:
We heated with a propane torch and after we tacked it together we tried again to pull it off.

One thing I should mention is that you should add some sort of welding shield or goggles to your little welding kit. 3 pairs of sunglasses and a bandanna wasn't easy to deal with.
 

· RIP Brad
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am the guy with the Readywelder that Abendx referenced. But what he didn't tell you, is that I ALWAYS take it on all trails that are far from the tow rig. The one run I didn't take it on, and needed it, was only 15 minutes from camp. Its actually pretty small and easy to transport, and who wouldn't want a spool gun for trail repairs! It is fully adjustable for different metal thickness and burns nice and hot. Use the Lincoln Flux core wire (the only flux core worth buying) and its a great tool.
Attempting to protect the innocent is not very effective if the innocent standup to be counted. :thefinger:

I guess I don't run those trails with you too often any longer... most of the time we run, it's very close to the trailers. So now I know... and see why yesterday at the shop, you said I'd have a perfect spot of the welder in my basket. I don't mind carrying it, but you might never get it back. :eek:

What kind of real estate are we talking and how much weight? I am pretty sure there is space next to the gas tank where you were thinking. Does your buggy have space after moving the batteries?
 

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Does your buggy have space after moving the batteries?
Yep after moving the fuel cell and battery, I will have room for it.

I need to find a better option for eye protection though. I have NO ROOM for a welding mask AT ALL. I am currently using a shade 5 OA goggle with dark sunglasses underneath, and a bandanna on my face to keep from getting burned by the rays. All this fits in my Readywelder case. I still need a higher shade. A set of #10 goggles would be perfect for this, but I haven't seen those for sale.
 

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I have seen a completely collapsable welding mask that covers your entire head. Not sure where to buy it, as it seemed pretty old.

The Readywelder doesn't take up much room. ( ruff estimate ) 18x12x4 plastic tool case.
 
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