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Discussion Starter #1
He said “mounting Lube”
Low hanging fruit, I get it.

Some place I read that you want to avoid ———, because it takes forever to dry out, and your wheels can actually “spin” inside the tire under heavy load.

“Heavy load”, more low hanging fruit.

I’m about to take my tire/wheels to get them mounted.

Anybody ever heard of avoiding a particular “lube” to prevent what I’m taking about, if so what is it, and what should I ask the shop to use?

Really wish I could remember where I read this stuff but I can’t.

Planned on bead locks but my budget wouldn’t allow at this time.

Any help, as always, is greatly appreciated.

Thanks
:{)
 

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Gunnery Sergeant USMC (ret)
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If you are taking your tires to get mounted at a shop, pretty sure they know what they are doing.


When I do mine (beadlocks) I just use good old dawn mixed with water.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you are taking your tires to get mounted at a shop, pretty sure they know what they are doing.





When I do mine (beadlocks) I just use good old dawn mixed with water.


Yea, we should be able to assume that a tire shop would know what they are doing but that was the whole point of whatever it was that I read.

They mentioned “cutting corners” etc.

And specifically mentioned something that is commonly used but never really fully dries up. It continues to act as a lube (can and does) allow the tire to spin inside the wheel.

I can’t remember what the product was, or where I read it to reference.

It’s possible that it’s all a load of crap but thought it wouldn’t hurt to ask.

BTW, thanks for rubbing your bead locks in.
:{)
 

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you can go piss up a rope
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Tell the gentleman at the counter that you do not like lube and that you want your rim dry before they mount your goods.
 

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A little spit goes a loooooong ways, on the bud err I mean bead.




I kid, I kid


Joy and water is my preferred method
 

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You'd want to avoid using any oil based product as that'll stick around, for example using motor oil to mount tires would be a bad idea and would increase the odds of spinning a tire on the rim.

I've heard rumors that soapy water attacks aluminum wheels (chemically, this is certainly true). It may cause surface corrosion inside, but I've never heard any credible sources claim that it actually wrecks a wheel. Most people do use soapy water.
 

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you can go piss up a rope
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You'd want to avoid using any oil based product as that'll stick around, for example using motor oil to mount tires would be a bad idea and would increase the odds of spinning a tire on the rim.

I've heard rumors that soapy water attacks aluminum wheels (chemically, this is certainly true). It may cause surface corrosion inside, but I've never heard any credible sources claim that it actually wrecks a wheel. Most people do use soapy water.
I've used Generic windex (w/ no ammonia), WD-40, paul mitchell Extra-Body conditioner (ask me about my hair), soap and water, expensive tubs of no-mar - whatever is in reach. If it slips, it fits.

Raw aluminum wheels look like shit after a couple years no matter what so a little soap and water will just add character. Never seen it be an issue with countless aluminum wheels.
 

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I change quite a few of my own tires and have done so regularly for years.

Soapy water is the cheapest. When it dries, the soap has a glue-like property. The longer it's on, the harder it is to break the bead. Easy clean up.
Not my first choice but, one-off changes for those that don't regularly engage in tire changin', it's perfectly fine.

Paint/plastic/furniture spray polish and cleaner. I like Honda Spray Polish and Cleaner for bikes, tho' original Pledge also works well. Dries to a wax-like surface, makes like a semi-drying gasket film, easy to break the bead. Easiest option...just spray.
I have never spun a tire on a superbike (more common than most other motorsports), can not vouch for a mudder jammed in the rocks.
What I used before I decided to get a dedicated lube. No issues.

No-Mar. What I've settled on since about 5 years ago. Can be diluted for spray bottle use. Sticks when it's dry. Noticeable chemical smell. Not the easiest application (brush or squeeze-trigger bottle). I use a brush applicator.

If you're not changing tires regularly, you'll take an unfinished tub of No-Mar, et al, to the grave...a little goes a long way.

Spray cleaner has other uses so it won't go to waste.

Soapy water? Someone's doin' dishes after makin' sammiches, right?
 

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Gunnery Sergeant USMC (ret)
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I change quite a few of my own tires and have done so regularly for years.

Soapy water is the cheapest. When it dries, the soap has a glue-like property. The longer it's on, the harder it is to break the bead. Easy clean up.
Not my first choice but, one-off changes for those that don't regularly engage in tire changin', it's perfectly fine.

Paint/plastic/furniture spray polish and cleaner. I like Honda Spray Polish and Cleaner for bikes, tho' original Pledge also works well. Dries to a wax-like surface, makes like a semi-drying gasket film, easy to break the bead. Easiest option...just spray.
I have never spun a tire on a superbike (more common than most other motorsports), can not vouch for a mudder jammed in the rocks.
What I used before I decided to get a dedicated lube. No issues.

No-Mar. What I've settled on since about 5 years ago. Can be diluted for spray bottle use. Sticks when it's dry. Noticeable chemical smell. Not the easiest application (brush or squeeze-trigger bottle). I use a brush applicator.

If you're not changing tires regularly, you'll take an unfinished tub of No-Mar, et al, to the grave...a little goes a long way.

Spray cleaner has other uses so it won't go to waste.

Soapy water? Someone's doin' dishes after makin' sammiches, right?
changing tires is hard work, sammiches should be ready.:grin2:
 

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If you are taking your tires to get mounted at a shop, pretty sure they know what they are doing.


When I do mine (beadlocks) I just use good old dawn mixed with water.
Dawn was a good ole trick back in the bmx days allowed the grips to side on and helped lock them in place once it dried. It is my go to when ever putting shit together any more, in another lube is not required. recently put new seals on my Andersen patio door and used dawn to get it in the track and allowed me to make adjustments to it once in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the replies.

I just let the shop do what they do.
I did ask that they use whatever they use sparingly.
 
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