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Discussion Starter #1
I've done some searching but I haven't been able to find any specific info related to my potential plan.

So with some time on my hands, I've been researching my future plans for my rear axle. I would like to raise the control arm mounts approximately 2" to increase ground clearance, reduce control arm angles, and minimize rear roll steer. This should help the road manners (which are important to me) and reduce the chance of my 1350 driveshaft from contacting my gas tank.

Based on my usage, I don't feel that I would necessarily benefit from a rear long arm or 3-link configuration. I like the idea of the Metalcloak DB3 brackets but I don't want to go to a minimum of 4.5" lift or lose ground clearance. I'm happy at 3.5" lift and I am staying at 37-38" tire size as I am happy with Dana 44s on a gutless turd of a 2 door.

Stock lower bracket 2.5" bleow bottom of axle tube. (10 degree angle???)
Stock upper bracket 3.25" above top of axle tube. (7.5 degree angle???)
3.25" diameter stock axle tube.
9" of stock joint separation on rear axle

I have found some Ruff Stuff mounts that may work with some tweaks?





So i need to get out and flex rear suspension to see if there is enough room for a taller and slightly wider upper control arm mount with only 2" bumpstops, This is not close to being flexed out.

 

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Fairly easy to do. The Teraflex skid plates for the falcon shocks has the ability to go up an inch and a half, or so. The pattern would likely work for whatever shock you are using.
 

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Its easy to do and I generally recommend at least raising the lowers to the the bottom of the tube for better clearance and flatter link angle. What are you going to do with the shock brackets? Leave them hanging down to catch on stuff? Looks like you are running 6-pack shocks?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Its easy to do and I generally recommend at least raising the lowers to the the bottom of the tube for better clearance and flatter link angle. What are you going to do with the shock brackets? Leave them hanging down to catch on stuff? Looks like you are running 6-pack shocks?
Yes, I'm running 6pak shocks and I also have Synergy upper shock mounts. I have plenty of options to get the shocks up above the bottom of the axle tube. I would like to raise them as much as possible to keep them out of harms way. I seriously doubt I can take advantage of the max droop due to short 2-door driveshaft. I will probably have to setup a center limit strap to protect the driveshaft angles.

Would there be much benefit in possibly increasing the separation of the control arms on the axle? The upper mount pictured in OP has 3 heights to chose from, and the middle hole would match the 9" of stock separation. If the mount doesn't hit the frame, I would have the potential of 10.25" of separation.

Ignore the position of the shock body. The shock has been recharged and now is within correct specs.

 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would throw the heights into a suspension calculator and see how it looks as far as your anti squat goes.
I just finally found the program and will start playing around.

Is it correct that I should have 25% of my tire diameter as joint separation? Does that go for both frame side and axle side?

So the first thing I'm noticing is that I will have to either shorten my rear lower control arms to approximately 18" if I want to keep the factory frame mount; or I can redo the lower frame mount to keep my 20" lower control arms. I don't think I'll run into much problems with the upper arms.
 

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25% at the axle end, typically the amount of separation at the frame will dictate the amount of squat you get. The tighter you make the separation the stronger the mounts need to be, it's a leverage thing.
 

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OP, are those durospring bump stops worth a shit? I ask cause I don't do wild rock crawling like you guys do. I mostly stick to overlanding & the occasional Rail road crossing everyday to work that I swear I slams me into my bump stops on days I'm forced to keep up with traffic flow. They're at an angle that's just right for my JKU wheelbase that for whatever reason, forces my JKU to rock hard side to side when going over the tracks.

Basically looking for something softer than my stock bump stops that isn't expensive like air bump stops.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
OP, are those durospring bump stops worth a shit? I ask cause I don't do wild rock crawling like you guys do. I mostly stick to overlanding & the occasional Rail road crossing everyday to work that I swear I slams me into my bump stops on days I'm forced to keep up with traffic flow. They're at an angle that's just right for my JKU wheelbase that for whatever reason, forces my JKU to rock hard side to side when going over the tracks.

Basically looking for something softer than my stock bump stops that isn't expensive like air bump stops.
Short answer YES.

Long answer:
These are the SumoSprings by Super Springs, Metalcloak also sold these before they designed their own Durosprings. Yes they work well and I have been playing around with them and they really do help soften the transition to bottoming out. I have a relatively light 2 door and I don't overland; so I think they are not perfect for my situation. I think if I were to keep these I would need to reduce my bumpstop stack by 1"; they don't appear to collapse as much as the stock bumpstops or Metacloak Durospring bumpstops. I actually just ordered the Metalcloak durosprings because I want more travel and a softer transition to bottoming out. I rock crawl, have a lighter vehicle, I don't overland, and I don't intend to baja or jump my Jeep. I will do some testing to see if the Metalcloak Durosprings suit my situation better.

Unfortunately I don't have any good pictures of rear of vehicle sitting on bumpstop. I would imagine performance would be similar since construction seems similar, just the mounting method is different.

Rear bumpstop about 1" longer than stock



reference



Weight of 2 door on front bumpstop, about 2" collapsed length.
 
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Did you ever do this? I'm about to finally get around to the same thing; very similar setup with the 6paks and sumo springs. Wondering if you ran into any issues.

I'm worried about e brake line clearance at full droop and upper bracket clearance at full stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm still working out the details. It doesn't appear the upper mount will interfere with the frame rail during normal flex but I did recently remove the rear swaybar and increased the articulation in the rear. I have also lowered the rear upper shock mounts another 1".

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