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Well at least on 4 wheels so far. I'll probably do the 5th today as I am awaiting the wheel from UPS.

I installed the Staun Products bead locks into 4 wheels yesterday and mounted 4 35x17x12.5 BFG MT TA on Cragar 342 D Ring styled black steelies 17 x 8

I have never mounted this sized tire before and the biggest in the past was just a little ATC tire that only required a little arm to get the tires on the wheels. Thankfully my friend owns an auto repair shop and was willing to let me give it a whirl with some instruction. It's not as hard as it seems but also not as easy as it looks.

Installing the Staun Bead Lock was pretty straight forward after watching the included install video and reading the included install instructions. All of which are available for you to preview on the Staun website. Needless to say I didn't take any pictures because there was not much else really to see.

To me the hard hard was actually getting my hand inside the tire to push the inner tube valve stem into the hole I drilled into the wheels. Everything else went fairly smoothly.

The first wheel took about 30 minutes and this did not include drilling the wheel as I had done that prior to arriving at the shop where the tires were mounted on the wheels. It isn't very complicated but there is limited space to work and with hands my size it just takes a little more maneuvering. I have to add this caveat, having your hands plastered with chalk or baby powder doesn't really help in the finger gription department. I dropped the valve stem nuts more than once and one time into the wheel and got to search for it.

By the time I had finished the third tire I was on a roll and had the system down pat or so I thought. The third wheel took between 10 to 15 minutes to install so practice was making perfect.

By the fourth tire I was tired. It was at the end of a long 16 hour day and I missed an important step. Which was to make sure the tube was free inside the outer bead lock case. I got the tire mounted up with a little difficulty and the old rule of if it isn't going smooth something is wrong should apply because I should have double checked everything instead of pressing forward. I started airing up the inner tire and got to near 45 pounds when POP and not the good bead sitting POP either. Apparently I had pinched the tube between the wheel and the outer bead lock case.

Oh well it holds air and the 4 35's can be taken to Nth today so they can mount them and test out the flexing on the new 4+ lift they are installing on my JK. When I get the JK back I'll dismount the tire and re-install a new tube. Lesson learned, take your time and if it isn't going smoothly something is wrong.

I am looking forward to testing these out in Moab as I have about 19 days left before I arrive there.

Now to call Staun and test out customer service and see how much a replacement tube is.
 

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Thanks Casey! I can't wait either. Got a glimpse today albeit on the rack and a few parts on the floor.

I went with Staun for a couple of reasons.

Looks less like a bead lock than bead locks do.

Weighs less than a traditional bead lock with same wheels.

Changing out a Staun bead locked wheel is very similar to a traditional wheel a bolted bead lock will take longer with 70 some odd bolts to undo/redo.

If I destroy the wheel I can still reuse the bead lock on another wheel.

If I rip out the sidewall of the tire a traditional bead lock will ride on the rim, usually destroying the wheel. The Staun acts more like a run flat and will keep the rim about an inch off the ground.

Traditional beadlocks typically only lock the outside of the tire. The Staun bead lock, locks both sides of the tire to the wheel.

I think that about covers it.
 

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Actually I think there are 3 other reasons:

1 Its the only beadlock actually DOT approved, you don't have the chance of loosing the bead at high speeds as a bolt would come loose...not that its likely but there is a change. No chance with Staun.

2. You actually can balance a Staun beadlock rim. Normal beadlocks are next to impossible to balance, thats why they mostly go on trail rigs. Your 40dollar home built beadlocks not a chance in balancing, though I've heard trailready rims there is a chance to balance.

3. You can choose whatever rim you want for your look and turn it into a beadlock, your not stuck with the 3 or 4 designs for tradiitional beadlocks out there.

You add up all those reasons, and yes your getting close to the cost of top line trail ready beadlocks but your have arguably 3 times the product. When I buy my JK next year and sell the TJ Staun's are on the list for the 5k I'm dumping into it.
 

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Actually I think there are 3 other reasons:

1 Its the only beadlock actually DOT approved, you don't have the chance of loosing the bead at high speeds as a bolt would come loose...not that its likely but there is a change. No chance with Staun.

2. You actually can balance a Staun beadlock rim. Normal beadlocks are next to impossible to balance, thats why they mostly go on trail rigs. Your 40dollar home built beadlocks not a chance in balancing, though I've heard trailready rims there is a chance to balance.

3. You can choose whatever rim you want for your look and turn it into a beadlock, your not stuck with the 3 or 4 designs for tradiitional beadlocks out there.

You add up all those reasons, and yes your getting close to the cost of top line trail ready beadlocks but your have arguably 3 times the product. When I buy my JK next year and sell the TJ Staun's are on the list for the 5k I'm dumping into it.
Hutchinson makes DOT-approved conventional beadlocks.
My steel allied beadlocks have balanced just fine with 35" MTRs, we'll see how they do with bias Maxxis Creepy Crawlers;)
Having said all that, most likely I will be "upgrading" to Stauns when the time comes for new rims.
 

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Yeah, diggin up a dead one here...

i just have to say I have Stauns on My CJ with 34 TSls.

They have held up amazingly well. I did as MichaelW said:

If I destroy the wheel I can still reuse the bead lock on another wheel.

If I rip out the sidewall of the tire a traditional bead lock will ride on the rim, usually destroying the wheel. The Staun acts more like a run flat and will keep the rim about an inch off the ground.
I actually didn't realize the rim was waffled until we were out of the rock and on flat ground-- the inside of the rim was peeled back and rubbing on the caliper-- I rode through half of the obsticle on the Staun ( I had heard the air 'burp' at one point, but none of the tires were down on the rims, so I kept going).

They are a great product-- aside form checkng their pressure once a month (as reccomended-- keep them at 47PSI!), there is no other maintenece to be done!
 

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Wow, bringing the the dead and dusty.... :smokin:

Yep and FWIW, I still love my STAUN BEAD LOCKS!
 
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