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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which ones do you use in your Jeep. I know a lot of OEM replacement parts are a lot of the times better than aftermarket or name brand. I am curious about your experiences with spark plugs.

Which do you use? Why?
 

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Which ones do you use in your Jeep. I know a lot of OEM replacement parts are a lot of the times better than aftermarket or name brand. I am curious about your experiences with spark plugs.

Which do you use? Why?
On Spark plugs, the OEM supplier is often the same as aftermarket. I believe the OEM supplier for our Jeeps is Champion and those are junk. I use NGK in everything, even the BMW. When I replaced the heads on my 3.6, the new Mopar heads came with a set of brand new Champions pre-installed. I threw them away and put NGKs in. I actually purchased two sets of NGKs and then indexed them (aimed the gap at the intake valves). I returned the ones that I didn't end up using to Amazon Prime. The plugs that came in my 3.6 new from the factory were also Champion. When I was a full time tech, we never had problems with NGK or ND (Nippon Denso) plugs. Everything I worked on had aluminum heads. If I ever had a faulty plug that just went bad and caused a misfire or one that broke off in the head or stripped out, it was almost always an Autolite or a Champion. Also, never put antiseize on them. I've had zero issues with NGK and have replaced countless sets of plugs over the last 40 years.

If it matters, I was running NGKs when my jeep was still supercharged and running methanol injection.

FWIW, if you need an O2 sensor, NTK (NGK) is good there too.The OEM O2 sensors in my 3.6 are NTK. Not a huge fan of Bosch for the O2 sensors of spark plugs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
On Spark plugs, the OEM supplier is often the same as aftermarket. I believe the OEM supplier for our Jeeps is Champion and those are junk. I use NGK in everything, even the BMW. When I replaced the heads on my 3.6, the new Mopar heads came with a set of brand new Champions pre-installed. I threw them away and put NGKs in. I actually purchased two sets of NGKs and then indexed them (aimed the gap at the intake valves). I returned the ones that I didn't end up using to Amazon Prime. The plugs that came in my 3.6 new from the factory were also Champion. When I was a full time tech, we never had problems with NGK or ND (Nippon Denso) plugs. Everything I worked on had aluminum heads. If I ever had a faulty plug that just went bad and caused a misfire or one that broke off in the head or stripped out, it was almost always an Autolite or a Champion. Also, never put antiseize on them. I've had zero issues with NGK and have replaced countless sets of plugs over the last 40 years.

If it matters, I was running NGKs when my jeep was still supercharged and running methanol injection.

FWIW, if you need an O2 sensor, NTK (NGK) is good there too.The OEM O2 sensors in my 3.6 are NTK. Not a huge fan of Bosch for the O2 sensors of spark plugs.
Thanks! I knew there was another spark plug that people swore by. I have the misfire code. For about 2 years. New spark plugs and the injector. I need to go look at the paperwork to see which plugs were put in.

Also on the antisieze we just did an episode about that. I said yes to putting antisieze on the spark plugs along with another host. Your opinion is no on the NGK's?
 

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Thanks! I knew there was another spark plug that people swore by. I have the misfire code. For about 2 years. New spark plugs and the injector. I need to go look at the paperwork to see which plugs were put in.

Also on the antisieze we just did an episode about that. I said yes to putting antisieze on the spark plugs along with another host. Your opinion is no on the NGK's?
There are a couple older threads where NGK was a problem. Others swear by them.
One I forgot was that the 15 pound torque is for lubricated/antisieze coated threads.
Also the red locktite and JB Weld parts are /s.
 

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Thanks! I knew there was another spark plug that people swore by. I have the misfire code. For about 2 years. New spark plugs and the injector. I need to go look at the paperwork to see which plugs were put in.

Also on the antisieze we just did an episode about that. I said yes to putting antisieze on the spark plugs along with another host. Your opinion is no on the NGK's?
Ahh... you have a misfire. That explains your original question. You forgot to post the OBD-II codes. If you're misfiring due to a bad plug, it's probably a Champion. If it's a misfire on the even bank (2, 4 or 6) and you have a pentastar built before ~February of 2013 then you may want to check the Julian date code stamped on the heads. The valve seats on the bank 2 head (driver's side) could have come loose. It was a problem on the early Pentastars and the warranty was extended on those. There is/was a TSB floating around on it, citing the fault codes and a resolution of replacing the bank 2 head. The problemwas limited to bank 2 for some reason.

It's not clear in your post. You replaced the spark plugs already and the fuel injectors? If you're getting a misfire code for just one cylinder, then you can try and diagnose it by swapping the ignition coil with a cylinder thats not throwing a code. I've read that the coils occasionally go bad on these engines. Mine werent faulty but I replaced them a while back with MSDs.

If you did a YouTube episode about slathering anti seize on spark plugs you probably did your research and are no doubt the expert here. My opinion is that anti seize on spark plugs is a solution looking for a problem (that doesn't exist). Any decent, modern spark plug has a zinc or other coating on it that won't corrode in a modern aluminum head. Seized spark plugs in aluminum heads really hasn't been a problem in modern engines when a quality plug is used. There may be some exceptions to this but I would attribute it to a poorly made spark plug or perhaps a specific engine - not our Jeeps, though. FOr example, some Ford engines have just a few threads for the spark plugs and are known problems. Personally, I still wouldn't use anti seize on those and would pay more attention to the torque and using a quality plug.

Don't take my word for it, though, NGK has their own statement on the subject posted here:

I would't doubt that most if not all of the other plug manufacturers have similar statements and reccomend against it as well.

The factory shop manual does not say anything about using anti seize but it is pretty specific with the recommended torque. Using anti seize would increase the amount of torque you need:
  1. Start the spark plug into the cylinder head by hand to avoid cross threading.

    CAUTION:
    Spark plug torque is critical and must not exceed the specified value. Overtightening stretches the spark plug shell reducing its heat transfer capability resulting in possible catastrophic engine failure.
  2. Tighten the spark plugs to 17.5 N·m (13 ft. lbs.).
If theres a place for anti seize, I would probably use some on a craptastic Autolite spark plug installed into a cast iron head.

Edit: Also make sure to use NGKs that are made in Japan. I made the mistake of buying a set of NGKs for the jeep that were made under license in Korea. They are the same part number as for our 3.6l jeeps but are the OEM plugs for a Hyundai V-6. They usually cost a lot less on amazon too. The boxes and the plugs themselves look nearly identical except for the Korean writing. It is my understanding that the Korean NGKs are of a lower quality. When I recieved them from Amazon on one order, I returned them.
 

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There are a couple older threads where NGK was a problem. Others swear by them.
One I forgot was that the 15 pound torque is for lubricated/antisieze coated threads.
Also the red locktite and JB Weld parts are /s.
No spark plug is perferct. It would be great to read these threads you mention. Yes, you need to increase the torque when lubricating the threads but that's not advised.

You're scaring me with this talk of JB Weld and red Locktite. Not sure what your'e trying to say with that but definitly keep it away from your spark plugs.
 

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No spark plug is perferct. It would be great to read these threads you mention. Yes, you need to increase the torque when lubricating the threads but that's not advised.

You're scaring me with this talk of JB Weld and red Locktite. Not sure what your'e trying to say with that but definitly keep it away from your spark plugs.
You should have been there. Anyone who actually changed a plug would know OP was fucking around. But it did generate some good info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ahh... you have a misfire. That explains your original question. You forgot to post the OBD-II codes. If you're misfiring due to a bad plug, it's probably a Champion. If it's a misfire on the even bank (2, 4 or 6) and you have a pentastar built before ~February of 2013 then you may want to check the Julian date code stamped on the heads. The valve seats on the bank 2 head (driver's side) could have come loose. It was a problem on the early Pentastars and the warranty was extended on those. There is/was a TSB floating around on it, citing the fault codes and a resolution of replacing the bank 2 head. The problemwas limited to bank 2 for some reason.

It's not clear in your post. You replaced the spark plugs already and the fuel injectors? If you're getting a misfire code for just one cylinder, then you can try and diagnose it by swapping the ignition coil with a cylinder thats not throwing a code. I've read that the coils occasionally go bad on these engines. Mine werent faulty but I replaced them a while back with MSDs.

If you did a YouTube episode about slathering anti seize on spark plugs you probably did your research and are no doubt the expert here. My opinion is that anti seize on spark plugs is a solution looking for a problem (that doesn't exist). Any decent, modern spark plug has a zinc or other coating on it that won't corrode in a modern aluminum head. Seized spark plugs in aluminum heads really hasn't been a problem in modern engines when a quality plug is used. There may be some exceptions to this but I would attribute it to a poorly made spark plug or perhaps a specific engine - not our Jeeps, though. FOr example, some Ford engines have just a few threads for the spark plugs and are known problems. Personally, I still wouldn't use anti seize on those and would pay more attention to the torque and using a quality plug.

Don't take my word for it, though, NGK has their own statement on the subject posted here:

I would't doubt that most if not all of the other plug manufacturers have similar statements and reccomend against it as well.

The factory shop manual does not say anything about using anti seize but it is pretty specific with the recommended torque. Using anti seize would increase the amount of torque you need:
  1. Start the spark plug into the cylinder head by hand to avoid cross threading.

    CAUTION:
    Spark plug torque is critical and must not exceed the specified value. Overtightening stretches the spark plug shell reducing its heat transfer capability resulting in possible catastrophic engine failure.
  2. Tighten the spark plugs to 17.5 N·m (13 ft. lbs.).
If theres a place for anti seize, I would probably use some on a craptastic Autolite spark plug installed into a cast iron head.

Edit: Also make sure to use NGKs that are made in Japan. I made the mistake of buying a set of NGKs for the jeep that were made under license in Korea. They are the same part number as for our 3.6l jeeps but are the OEM plugs for a Hyundai V-6. They usually cost a lot less on amazon too. The boxes and the plugs themselves look nearly identical except for the Korean writing. It is my understanding that the Korean NGKs are of a lower quality. When I recieved them from Amazon on one order, I returned them.
Wow Thanks!!! AWESOME INFO!

First I never did a YouTube video on anti-seize. I as well as one of the hosts of the Jeep Talk Show, mentioned the anti seize on the spark plugs, during a podcast episode. My YouTube Channel is just me. The Jeep Talk Show is a podcast (not mine) I am one of 4 co-hosts. Two different platforms. I am just mentioning for clarification.

I find the anti seize information interesting. I now wonder if maybe the reason some "old school" mechanics use it on the spark plugs is because maybe that is what you had to do on those "old school" vehicles. And now they just continue using it on newer vehicles when you don't need to. Just a guess. I got my information from my former... ummm... not sure what to call him... "old school" mechanic... grifter is a good word to describe him. A tough life lesson I learned maybe I will share one day on another thread or you might see it on Dateline one day.

As for my misfire 6. It is a long boring story. I honestly am not even sure I believe what I was told. Or feel confident of the work done to my Jeep, so now I am trying to research and educate myself on the issue. I have been putting it off because one, I have no money, thanks to said grifter and just got a job. Two, I was too busy trying to heal myself emotionally, again thanks to said grifter, and honestly that is all I could manage at the time. Three, I totally lost my Jeep support system and am in the land of 10,000 lakes where no one knows about 4x4. I do feel horrible for neglecting my Jeep.

I first had the check engine light go on while I was in Texas as a Taco Place eating in my Jeep while it was running. It was ungodly hot. I made it to a 4x4 shop who said it was a misfire 6. They changed the spark plugs. All was good. Then the engine light went back on later. I was told something about not getting enough oxygen and I might have to replace the ignition coil. I was only in Texas temporarily. I was told I would be fine until I arrived at my new location. Then the engine light went off again. I made it to my destination and had to go rescue a Jeep in California that was broke down on the Rubicon Trail. As I flat towed that Jeep (little itty bitty CJ)(another long life lesson story) back from Cali to Colorado the check engine light came on again. It would come on and off sporadically for months. Finally said grifter supposedly replaced the ignition coil. Did he swap out to see if that was truly the issue. Not sure. The problem went away for months now it is back.

So....now, I am trying to trouble shoot the issue myself while I get back on my feet emotionally and financially.
 

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Wow Thanks!!! AWESOME INFO!

First I never did a YouTube video on anti-seize. I as well as one of the hosts of the Jeep Talk Show, mentioned the anti seize on the spark plugs, during a podcast episode. My YouTube Channel is just me. The Jeep Talk Show is a podcast (not mine) I am one of 4 co-hosts. Two different platforms. I am just mentioning for clarification.

I find the anti seize information interesting. I now wonder if maybe the reason some "old school" mechanics use it on the spark plugs is because maybe that is what you had to do on those "old school" vehicles. And now they just continue using it on newer vehicles when you don't need to. Just a guess. I got my information from my former... ummm... not sure what to call him... "old school" mechanic... grifter is a good word to describe him. A tough life lesson I learned maybe I will share one day on another thread or you might see it on Dateline one day.

As for my misfire 6. It is a long boring story. I honestly am not even sure I believe what I was told. Or feel confident of the work done to my Jeep, so now I am trying to research and educate myself on the issue. I have been putting it off because one, I have no money, thanks to said grifter and just got a job. Two, I was too busy trying to heal myself emotionally, again thanks to said grifter, and honestly that is all I could manage at the time. Three, I totally lost my Jeep support system and am in the land of 10,000 lakes where no one knows about 4x4. I do feel horrible for neglecting my Jeep.

I first had the check engine light go on while I was in Texas as a Taco Place eating in my Jeep while it was running. It was ungodly hot. I made it to a 4x4 shop who said it was a misfire 6. They changed the spark plugs. All was good. Then the engine light went back on later. I was told something about not getting enough oxygen and I might have to replace the ignition coil. I was only in Texas temporarily. I was told I would be fine until I arrived at my new location. Then the engine light went off again. I made it to my destination and had to go rescue a Jeep in California that was broke down on the Rubicon Trail. As I flat towed that Jeep (little itty bitty CJ)(another long life lesson story) back from Cali to Colorado the check engine light came on again. It would come on and off sporadically for months. Finally said grifter supposedly replaced the ignition coil. Did he swap out to see if that was truly the issue. Not sure. The problem went away for months now it is back.

So....now, I am trying to trouble shoot the issue myself while I get back on my feet emotionally and financially.
A lot of extraneous words here. What year is your jeep and what is the P0xxx code? You can pull the code yourself with a phone app like Torque or JScan and an inexpensive OBD-II port to Bluetooth device.

I have this one and it works well with both of the aformentioned phone apps:

If you have a very early 2013 or older, you might have the valve seat issue I mentioned.

Here is the TSB on that. If your "misfire 6" is really a P0306 OBD-II code and you have a 2013 or earlier 3.6 then you could have a bad head (loose valve seats):

Sorry to quote another forum but I couldn't find a similar post here on JKO. Here is how to check your Julian date code on the driver's side head. The code is engraved on the top side of the head, right next to where the catalytic converter flange attatches to the head:

It doesnt sound like you have a bad spark plug, especially if they've already been replaced and you are still throwing the same code.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A lot of extraneous words here. What year is your jeep and what is the P0xxx code? You can pull the code yourself with a phone app like Torque or JScan and an inexpensive OBD-II port to Bluetooth device.

I have this one and it works well with both of the aformentioned phone apps:

If you have a very early 2013 or older, you might have the valve seat issue I mentioned.

Here is the TSB on that. If your "misfire 6" is really a P0306 OBD-II code and you have a 2013 or earlier 3.6 then you could have a bad head (loose valve seats):

Sorry to quote another forum but I couldn't find a similar post here on JKO. Here is how to check your Julian date code on the driver's side head. The code is engraved on the top side of the head, right next to where the catalytic converter flange attatches to the head:

It doesnt sound like you have a bad spark plug, especially if they've already been replaced and you are still throwing the same code.
I have a cheap code reader. I will check it out. My Jeep is a 2015 JKUR

Thanks Again
 

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Actually yes seriously. There are a 158 million Americans who are effected by emotional abuse. I shared my story in hopes to help others who feel they are going thru that shit alone. Which I have helped others and made some new friends because of it.
Promoting positive mental health isn't always about people who are nuts. (Neurological or psychological issues)
Sometimes it's people who saw or experienced any number of forms of trauma. I'm not an expert by any means, but I guarantee that if there was a positive form of therapy for 30% of the kids I grew up with, we would have eliminated 90% of the bullying we did.
 

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I have a cheap code reader. I will check it out. My Jeep is a 2015 JKUR

Thanks Again
With a 2015 it is very unlikely to be the head/valve seat issue I was referring to above. I would look for a bad spark plug or ignition coil. Easiest/cheapest thing to do would be to swap the #6 coil with another coil on the same bank and see of the code follows it. I am assuming you are throwing a P0306 code or something else pointing to a misfire on #6. If it's teh coil, you can get away with replacing just the bad one if you're on a budget. Replacing all 6 is ideal, though. For coils, I like the MSD, Accel (same company) or NGK brands.

A tank or two of gas with Techron or VP Fuels Octanium Unleaded might work if you have a plugged injector.
 

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Actually yes seriously. There are a 158 million Americans who are effected by emotional abuse. I shared my story in hopes to help others who feel they are going thru that shit alone. Which I have helped others and made some new friends because of it.
Sorry, Im confused.


As for my misfire 6. It is a long boring story.
I thought you meant the misfire saga was the long boring story you wrote an Amazon book about.

Anyway, as to your original spark plug question, I think you already received one answer from one person. I'll tap out of this thread now and let others share their spark plug opinions.

If this is really a thread about your #6 misfire, maybe change the title or start a different thread. If you've already had the spark plugs changed recently and the code persisted then it may not be the plugs at all or they were never really replaced and you possibly got ripped off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
With a 2015 it is very unlikely to be the head/valve seat issue I was referring to above. I would look for a bad spark plug or ignition coil. Easiest/cheapest thing to do would be to swap the #6 coil with another coil on the same bank and see of the code follows it. I am assuming you are throwing a P0306 code or something else pointing to a misfire on #6. If it's teh coil, you can get away with replacing just the bad one if you're on a budget. Replacing all 6 is ideal, though. For coils, I like the MSD, Accel (same company) or NGK brands.

A tank or two of gas with Techron or VP Fuels Octanium Unleaded might work if you have a plugged injector.
Sorry, Im confused.




I thought you meant the misfire saga was the long boring story you wrote an Amazon book about.

Anyway, as to your original spark plug question, I think you already received one answer from one person. I'll tap out of this thread now and let others share their spark plug opinions.

If this is really a thread about your #6 misfire, maybe change the title or start a different thread. If you've already had the spark plugs changed recently and the code persisted then it may not be the plugs at all or they were never really replaced and you possibly got ripped off.
It really is about spark plugs. I have been learning a lot about OEM since my new job, and how its all engineered specifically for your vehicle. I just wanted to get real world advice about them. Especially since some information I have received in the past is questionable. Like the anti seize on spark plugs for one. Another is how a brand name is better than OEM.

And yes I think I was ripped off with several issues one being the misfire 6 issue. I was eventually going to seek advice on that one just not ready to absorb it all. I am a one thing at a time kinda gal.

You don't need to apologize at all for the misunderstanding. I shouldn't of posted it here. I guess sometimes I am overly passionate about it.

Oh... You can't tag out yet! 😀 I have more questions. Like about the gas. Where do you find that? How do you know it's a certain type?
 

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It really is about spark plugs. I have been learning a lot about OEM since my new job, and how its all engineered specifically for your vehicle.
You're missing my point and getting twisted around the axle on the spark plugs for no reason. Mopar does not manufacture spark plugs and the plugs are not really specifically designed for the vehicle per se. It's more that an engine was designed with a particular spark plug in mind in terms of the threads, heat range and build materials. Iridium and platinum spark plugs are used in probably all gas vehicles these days in order to meet government maintenance standards for longer 100,000 service intervals. Think of spark plugs like you think of motor oil, power steering fluid or transmission fluid. A third party makes those items and while they are designed for use in our cars, often the auto manufacturer specifies a pre-existing spark plug style and heat range or oil weight with additives rather than the other way around.

The plugs that came pre-installed on my Jeep from the factory when it was new were Champion RER8ZWYCB4. I am 99.99% sure those same plugs came pre-installed on yours too. The same plug came pre-installed on the new Mopar cylinder heads that I purchased last year. They weren't labeled Mopar. They were labeled Champion and had that part number stamped on them. This same plug fits some Volkswagen models (because they have a Pentastar engine) as well as some Honda models and Hyundai and Kia models too. Most likely they are also specified for other brands that I didn't mention. Whether you pay a premium and buy the spark plugs branded as Mopar, Volkswagen, Honda, Hyundai or Kia is up to you. You'll just pay more, around double, for that privilege. Other than the labeling on the box and on the spark plug, its the same plug. Mopar probably uses Champion because Champion is a US company.

The OEM supplier to Honda, Hyundai and Kia is most likely NGK and not Champion. As stated, I prefer the NGKs, which are the functional equivalent and IMHO of a higher quality. The NGK plug for a 3.6 JK is the SILZKR7B11 (also goes by 9723). The NGK plugs specified for Hyundai and Kia (with the same part number) are probably made under license in Korea rather than in Japan like the rest of the NGK plugs. Sometimes youll get the Korean plugs through Amazon for a cheaper price than the Japanese equivalents even though the part number (SILZKR7B11) is the same. They will have Korean writing on the box rather than Japanese. I think I gave a set of the Korean NGKs to @snout a while back.




I have more questions. Like about the gas. Where do you find that? How do you know it's a certain type?
You can find gas at your local gas station and the octane is marked on the pump. I am referring to fuel additives (fuel system cleaners), which you can get at your local parts store. Put a bottle or two of Techron in before filling your tank and then burn through the whole tank of gas. Maybe do it a second time. That can clear out a clogged injector. Chevron makes Techron and it is already added in smaller quantities to Chevron and Texaco fuels. I also like VP Fuels Octanium Unleaded and O'reilly stocks that along with Techron. Other folks may have their own favorites.
 

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I think I gave a set of the Korean NGKs to @snout a while back.
I believe so too. I'll see if I can't dig them out for a photo of the box.
Personally, I stick with NGK and Denso plugs. I save the Autolite / Motorcraft, Champion, Bosch, E3 / Splitfire plugs for when I'm doing maint on my lawn mower.
Unrelated fun fact. Several Toyota models come from the factory with NGK's in one bank and Denso in the other. I always thought that was interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You're missing my point and getting twisted around the axle on the spark plugs for no reason. Mopar does not manufacture spark plugs and the plugs are not really specifically designed for the vehicle per Se...
Getting twisted around axles is kinda my thing. Your response was perfect, clear and precise. So, Mopar oil and coolant would kinda be the same?



"You can find gas at your local gas station..."
🤣🤣🤣🤣 Good one.


"and the octane is marked on the pump. I am referring to fuel additives.". Thanks... Again great info.

You could be my tech guy for my YouTube channel... 🤪
 
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