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Discussion Starter #1
I did a little investigation a few weeks ago on the question of snow and tire pressures. I am using the stock rubi tires for now. The test bed was a forest service road in the Cascades in Oregon.

At full pressure, I couldn't make it past the first deep drift. I actually ended up high centered about half way through trying to see if I could do it without airing down. 20 minutes of shoveling later, I was airing down and on my way again. There is no question that even the stock tires worked better in this Spring snow when they were aired down.

At one point I could tell the snow was pretty deep, so I stopped and dug a hole to measure the depth. Results are shown below. We continued several miles further to a pre-determined intersection, where we turned around. The snow looked to be a couple of feet deeper there. But I was too lazy to dig another hole to measure for sure. To get there the tires were at 5psi, both diffs locked, and creeping along at idle. There was also a lot of "back up and try again". The important thing was to not let the tires spin and dig.

The results:










Yes, the snow is really that deep. I am standing on the road surface in that last pic. The snow was over 4 1/2 feet deep! And like I said above, we kept going for miles further and higher in elevation. These were at something like 3500 ft.

I love my Jeep! :bounce:

I think red and white look good together. I can't wait to put some wide tires on it in the Fall, and see what it will REALLY do. ;)

Disclaimer:
I have been doing the deep snow thing for 10 years or so, was in an area I know very well, and had a means of self-recovery (mr. shovel). I have done many trips in this area both with groups and solo. Aired down like this in deep snow, the typical thing that happens to get a guy stuck is high centering. It takes me about 20 minutes to remove the snow from under the Jeep and get the weight back on the tires again. From there it is just a matter of driving gentle to get it rolling again. Been there, done that more times than I can count or remember. This particular trip I did get it completely stuck 2 or 3 times. It was no big deal - it is something I can deal with.

I do go prepared (as should anyone else heading out to a place like this). I had clothing with me with good enough insulation to spend the night if that had been required. I knew the area, had a GPS and had a good detailed map. I had the shovel. I have tried out several and know this one works well for moving a lot of snow in a timely manner. People at home knew specifically where I was going and when I was planning to be back.

I will readily admit that I was out near the pointy end of the stick. I am comfortable with that, having taken reasonable (to me) precautions. There was still risk that something bad *could* have happened. I am a rock climber, motorcycle rider, firefighter and swift water / high angle rescue tech. The level of risk I am willing to accept might be a bit different from other folks. Please filter my posts accordingly (in other words, follow me at your own risk!)
 

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No need to justify. We all do what we find fun.. no matter how scary/crazy/dangerous.
Just don't eat your spotter if you get stuck real bad. The rest will take care of itself as long as you keep your wits about you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Did you do this stuff with a cherokee before?
Yes, I did - and that without any lockers. But I didn't ever dig down and measure this much snow with the cherokee. I had 4 feet or so a couple of times, but this went beyond. I had better tires on the cherokee, so I think the lockers must have been the difference to let the Rubi do this well.
 
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