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Ok so this pic made think about something I was told a long time ago about snow driving. I always understood that you want loads of ground clearance and narrow tires to drive in typical snow and only use wide tires if you are driving through snow liek the around the world expedition trucks. Does anyone have input on this?
 

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Update for Adams County area is 18-24":shaking: with 30mph winds and drifting on Saturday.:bounce::bounce: Which usually equates to 4-6' drifts. Time to run to store to get the Milk, eggs, bread and toliet paper.
 

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Ok so this pic made think about something I was told a long time ago about snow driving. I always understood that you want loads of ground clearance and narrow tires to drive in typical snow and only use wide tires if you are driving through snow liek the around the world expedition trucks. Does anyone have input on this?
Depends on the type and depth of snow. Narrow tires will let you cut through the snow to solid ground underneath. If the snow is to deep, or you have an under layer of ice, you are better off with wide tires and trying to float on top of the snow layer. Obviously the type of snow will play a part powdery, you are going to go through it, hard packed and wet, you will have a hard time cutting through it.
 

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:) Absolutely, if the snow is about 16" or less, you're stock tires are fine-but



Depends on the type and depth of snow. Narrow tires will let you cut through the snow to solid ground underneath. If the snow is to deep, or you have an under layer of ice, you are better off with wide tires and trying to float on top of the snow layer. Obviously the type of snow will play a part powdery, you are going to go through it, hard packed and wet, you will have a hard time cutting through it.
When you get snow deeper then that, wider tires and air pressure all the way down to about 5 psi and GENTLE SKINNY PEDAL. no tire spin and sometimes you'll have to backup every 4/5 car lengths and clear the snow buildup in the middle (front of jeep)

It can be a lot of fun, but not if you try to be in a hurry !!

:grinpimp::grinpimp: JIMBO
 

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Ok so from the responses i think my logic (step father) was right. I am movign to WA soon and am thinkng about dedicated tires for winters got g wide MT right now. I have a vision of 40x9 studded tires in my head :smokin: Not sure if itll work but guess Ill find out
 

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Ok so from the responses i think my logic (step father) was right. I am movign to WA soon and am thinkng about dedicated tires for winters got g wide MT right now. I have a vision of 40x9 studded tires in my head :smokin: Not sure if itll work but guess Ill find out
What part of WA state are you heading to? There are some parts that you'll never really see sonw except for when you wheel.
 

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If we get more than 2 feet of snow the drifts will be near 4 feet tall. There aren't many rigs capable of running through that shit without acting more like a plow then anything else. Try pushing a thousand pounds of snow with the front of you jeep and look what happens to your grill.
 

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This is for off-roading in the snow only (not driving home from work).

* Lowwww tire pressure is the key to running on the deep or muddy/slushy snow. The difference is huge.

* Never wheel alone in the backcountry snow.

* If running through deep snow as a group, make sure the lead driver can drive straight because everyone else will be stuck in their tracks.

* Its best to put the rig with the tallest tires in front of the group and rigs with smaller tires in the back. This prevents high-centering in the snow.

* Never brake on off-camber sections of snowy trails. This will often cause you to slide off the trail.

* just like in mud, in deep snow keep the RPMs up and dont stop if you don't have to.

* Pay attention; rocks and fallen trees will not be noticed until you hit them.

* Shovel and recovery gear is a prerequisite for snow runs.
 

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You guys crack me up..:laughing:

For daily driving on snow.. Don't worry about it... Driving just below the speed limit on snow days where the snow is actually covering the roads all the way to 2 feet of snow is fine.. Don't lower the psi on your tires unless you want to fly off the road.

If your driving offroad, then yes lower the psi and drive slower.

But with normal everyday driving, your nuts to lower the psi and drive close to the suggested speed limit.

Narrower tires due much better in light to deep snow, ice (on paved or dirt roads at close to normal speeds) Your tires will act like the paddle on the back of a canoe when dragged in the water.. when you turn it will steer the entire jeep in the direction.

When driving on snow...regardless of the braking system... tap the pedal repeatedly to slow down faster and under control. The system does take over for you when you slam on the pedal and does the same thing.. But with these jeeps and how people drive, you'll lose control and end up starting to slide sideways..

If your sliding sideways and have quite a bit of room...hit the gas slightly to gain control with your steering and traction. Then after you've pointed your rig in the right direction start to brake ... Just don't slam the brake pedal to the floor and expect to stop in the direction you are going.

Plus reach down and pull the handle by your right foot and engage 4 wheel drive.. You don't have to stop and pull the handle.... I've done it at 40 mph. These rigs have changed over the years and are made to do just such a thing.

I only speak from 31 years of experience living in Alaska. And yes I've created my own lane with stock size tires, 91' full size single Cab pickup while in 4 wheel drive, when the snow was past my front bumper... Snow is lighter on the top then it is on the bottom. If your down South the snow tends to be wetter, which means the snow settles quicker and its denser at the top (then it would probably cave in your grille)

Washington gets all its snow in the mountains... Snow hasn't hit Seattle this season at all.. You don't have to worry to much about that.. Hell it snows in the mountains and then just rains right behind it.

Snow is easy to drive in. Sense your not used to driving in it, when you get here.. Don't freak out, just go up in the mountains and practice driving in it in the parking lots and side roads.. Get use to it. Don't let it surprise you and you not know how to drive on it.

I once saw my mother with a 70's VW Rabbit, with stock tires, go all the way up a one mile 3 foot snow covered mountain road to our house.. Don't say it can't be done...cause Alaskan's have been doing it for years in Subaru's and VW's. Momentum is the key.

And go prepared, food/water, Shovel, snow pants, gloves, hat, jacket, blanket if you have to sleep in your jeep. Even if your driving around town in a snow storm.
 
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