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Broker by the Minute
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Ok, I admit it this is the first automatic transmission I have owned for a very, very long time.

I want to drain and refill the transmission and transfer case fluids as a PM measure.

Is there not a drain plug on the auto tranny? I see the plugs on the t-case but since each call for a different capacity then they don't share fluid.

So if there is a drain plug on the tranny can someone show me where it is. Or do I need to drop the tranny pan and replace the filter at the same time?

Guess I'll be removing my skid plate to do all this.

I sure like my gate valve on my oil pan that has a hose on it so I can replace my motor oil in about 10 minutes.
 

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You've most probably read this already, but here it is anyway:

NOTE: Only fluids of the type labeled Mopar® ATF+4, Automatic Transmission Fluid, should be used in the transmission sump. A filter change should be made at the time of the transmission oil change. The magnet (on the inside of the oil pan) should also be cleaned with a clean, dry cloth. NOTE: If the transmission is disassembled for any reason, the fluid and filter should be changed.

1. Raise vehicle on a hoist. Place a drain container with a large opening, under transmission oil pan.


NOTE: One of the oil pan bolts (5) has a sealing patch applied from the factory. Separate this bolt for reuse.

2. Loosen pan bolts and tap the pan at one corner to break it loose allowing fluid to drain, then remove the oil pan.
3. Install a new filter and o-ring on bottom of the valve body and tighten retaining screws to 5 N·m (45 in. lbs.). NOTE: Before installing the oil pan bolt (5) in the bolt hole located between the torque converter clutch on and U/D clutch pressure tap circuits, it will be necessary to replentish the sealing patch on the bolt using Mopar® Lock & Seal Adhesive.

4. Clean the oil pan and magnet. Reinstall pan using new Mopar® Silicone Adhesive sealant. Tighten oil pan bolts to 20 N·m (14.5 ft. lbs.).
5. Pour four quarts of Mopar® ATF+4, Automatic Transmission Fluid, through the dipstick opening.
6. Start engine and allow to idle for at least one minute. Then, with parking and service brakes applied, move selector lever momentarily to each position, ending in the park or neutral position.
7. Check the transmission fluid level and add an appropriate amount to bring the transmission fluid level to 3mm (1/8 in.) below the lowest mark on the dipstick.
8. Recheck the fluid level after the transmission has reached normal operating temperature, 82° C (180°F).
9. To prevent dirt from entering transmission, make certain that dipstick is fully seated into the dipstick opening
I haven't looked and then FSM doesn't mention it, but quite often there will be a knockout plug on the bell housing, if you remove this and rotate the engine by hand, you will see the TC drain plug, and can then drain the TC also.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Phil. Although I didn't initially read that part, I was just hoping for a drain valve to flush the fluids as part of break in. Plus I believe the manual recommends fluid changes after being submergered. I did find the T-case drain and fill plugs, but was just hoping to find some for the tranny too.
 

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No "quick" way on the tranny, but a new filter is not a bad idea anyway. Besides you can write it up so we'll all know what to do when it's our turn ;)
 

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Hi I'm new here and will be in the market for a new JK in the upcoming year. I'm planning on getting an auto tranny as I just don't fancy the idea of dealing with 3 pedals when off-roading and well... I'm lazy. :)

Now I see that PhilD posted what looks to be the appropriate way of changing the auto tranny fluid. However... if you're planning on doing this a lot and don't like to get messy (like me) you might consider one of these if you have an air compressor.

http://www.griotsgarage.com/catalog.jsp?L1=L1_2000&L2=L2_3500&SKU=10186


No removing of bolts necessary. Just pull out the auto tranny dipstick, shove tube down dipstick channel and turn everything on. In a matter of minutes you have sucked out the old, then just funnel the new in through the dipstick channel and check your levels until you get it right.

Well worth the $100 imo. :) HTH
 

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However... if you're planning on doing this a lot and don't like to get messy (like me) you might consider one of these if you have an air compressor.
I have a hand operated one for doing oil changes on my boat and it works very well for that. I did try it another vehicle tranny once and it did a pretty good job, but on that vehicle there was a blocking plate a couple of inches from the bottom of the pan, so you couldn't get all the fluid out as the extraction tube couldn't go all the way to the bottom of the pan. The adapters for vacuum sucking the fluid out would work until the fluid was below the level of the dip stick entrance hole into the pan. No idea what the JK setup is like.

There are other ways to completely flush your fluid, like removing a tranny cooler line and pooring in new fluid as you collect the old fluid in a bucket. You need to be running the engine obviously, and need to make sure you add at the same rate you extract, but it can be done.

Another alternative is run an additional tranny filter off the cooler lines. These use oil filter style screw on filters and are very effective at filtering, usually at a lower size than the a tranny filter, so you never need to remove the tranny filter again.
 

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Yeh I was thinking more along the longs if you're just *slightly* anal and just wanna change your fluid all the time. This would be an easy way. And then once in a while do it the hard way to replace the filter and actually flush all the fluid out etc. :)
 

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Old thread, similar question.......and I saw Phil has the FSM directions up there. I'm sure that would be helpful to others;)

I've never had a transmission flushed before, just drain and change.

What do you think about dealer flush and fill? Is it worth it at 61500mi with a Jeep that's driven like fleet/taxi, lol?
 

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What do you think about dealer flush and fill? Is it worth it at 61500mi with a Jeep that's driven like fleet/taxi, lol?
If they use one of the machines that completely exchanges all the fluid then it is worth it, and they will have their machine setup with ATF+4. If they are just dropping the pan and changing the filter and fluid in the pan, then anywhere can do that for usually a lot less.

Other transmission shops may well have machines setup for ATF+4 too, and will usually be cheaper than the dealer, but if you are getting other work done at the dealer then the convenience factor may well make it easier just to get the dealer to do it.

I hate to say it, but these days wherever you go you almost have to stand over and watch them, to make sure they do what they say they are going to do.
 

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That's mainly why I was curious as the miles have packed on fast and I don't want any surprise transmission issues.

For the $230.00 my dealer quoted for the flush and fill, I could do the drain & change AND finally install the the cooler/gauge mod I've been planning forever.


I'm sure I could find a good shop to do the flush cheaper:confused:
 

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As a parallel, my Hyundai you pay 90.00 for them to drain and fill, 120 if you want them to pull the pan and replace the filter at the dealership. Jiffy Lube has all the equipment to do the flush and fill because they can't wait for the gasket to cure, I think they were 120 for the flush and fill and thats not the filter replacement. Whether or not they have the ATF+4 I'm sure they do.

Course the Dodge Durango cost 200 for the filter and tranny service at the dealership.

Personally I like the idea of pulling the coolant lines instead of pulling the pan, do you think the suction from the tranny pump could just sucks the new tranny fluid out of a bucket as you have the other one draining?
 

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do you think the suction from the tranny pump could just sucks the new tranny fluid out of a bucket as you have the other one draining?
I haven't tried it, but have thought about it. It would depend on where the pump is, if it's on the return line then it may well work, but I suspect it's on the out side of the line, so there would be no suction. Use two people one to pour in new fluid and watch how much is coming out, and another to man the ignition and cut it if you can't keep up.

I plan to do mine this way this weekend, so will let you know how it works.
 

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I haven't looked and then FSM doesn't mention it, but quite often there will be a knockout plug on the bell housing, if you remove this and rotate the engine by hand, you will see the TC drain plug, and can then drain the TC also.
Maybe it's a Chrysler thing but I have never seen a t.c. drain plug on any t.c./trans that I have worked on (GM Hydramatic, ZF, Aisin).

Also, being a former GM trans tech, I endorse the trans flush over a trans service. More costly but if done correctly, much more beneficial.
 

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Maybe it's a Chrysler thing but I have never seen a t.c. drain plug on any t.c./trans that I have worked on (GM Hydramatic, ZF, Aisin).
The Jeep service manual doesn't mention it either. However, I've drained the TC 4L60E and 4L65E trans that way in the past. If you remove the knock out plate and rotate the TC there's usually a hex plug that will allow you to drain it.
 

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The Jeep service manual doesn't mention it either. However, I've drained the TC 4L60E and 4L65E trans that way in the past. If you remove the knock out plate and rotate the TC there's usually a hex plug that will allow you to drain it.
They must have added that feature after I left the biz in early 2001. I never seen drain plugs in GM converters during my time.
 

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They must have added that feature after I left the biz in early 2001. I never seen drain plugs in GM converters during my time.
Maybe, I don't recall doing it on an old trans, but my memory is getting hazy as I am get older :D
 
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