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Discussion Starter #1
This is actually a two pronged question. I've been thinking about removing the rear sway bar to get more axle articulation. Has anyone done this? If I choose to keep it off, will it be undrivable on the road/hwy? It's not my everyday driver but I do drive to trail destinations. Pros and cons.

Second part. Steering stabilizers. I noticed some of you have removed them.
How necessary are they?

Feed back appreciated

RobV

4 door rubi, RE 4 1/2 long arm kit with acos spacers on 37's
 

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the rear sway bar links do not limit articulation. they provide stabilization. don't remove them. it won't make it undrivable, it will make cause your rig to have uncomfortable body roll, at best, and be unsafe at worst.

with your setup, the steering stabilizer will be a necessity. you'll feel way too much bumpsteer without it. i would consider that unsafe for highway driving.

these are just my opinions.
 

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How much articulation do you need? You already have one of the most flexworthy lifts that there is + 37s ?!?! Man, I would not recommend ditching the rear swaybar AT ALL. ESPECIALLY if you want to pull the stabilizer. Dont see the benefit in removing that either. OK...even if you scrapped these comonents...and the jeep rides/ handles well (cant imagine...), think of the safety issues...when you have to stop on a dime, or swerve to avoid an accident...And if you are in an accident...what about your insurance? Unless the claims adjuster is blind and derelict, if he/ she sees that these things were removed- then good luck getting them to believe that the wreck wasnt your fault. I have seen people that have removed the stabilizer, but only because of breakage or clearence issues...NOT to achieve more flex. I would think someone will have a different opinion, but I simply dont see the advantage and can see many disadvantages in return. JMO
 

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I wouldn't run on the street without sway bars, but that's me.

If you have the money for them, the currie antirocks are great. I have them front and rear and really like them on and off road.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Pretty much new the answer but I wanted to throw it out there because the idea was suggested by a mechanic that has worked on my Jeep. (embarrased to say). You guys on this forum are a knowledgable and reliable group. Should have listened when it came to diff cover choices.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I wouldn't run on the street without sway bars, but that's me.

If you have the money for them, the currie antirocks are great. I have them front and rear and really like them on and off road.
Not familiar with antirocks. How do they work?
 
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I ran mine with no sway bar links for a few weeks until I put spacers on the wheels and it felt ok. I don’t think I’d run it permanently like that but it’s not something I’d worry about driving to/from a trail.
 

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The rear sway bar is far less critical to safe handling on the street than the front. You can remove it and just adjust your driving style slightly if you want. That said I don't see much to be gained by doing so, the rear sway bar flexes very easily and allows for plenty of articulation already, as long as you have the right length links. I doubt you'd gain much flex (if any) by removing it.

In an ideal world if your steering is set up up correctly then you don't need a steering stabilizer, but we don't live in an ideal world. Roads have potholes, sudden changes in camber, etc, which without a steering stabilizer may cause unsafe handling, etc. At any speed off-road a stabilizer will help reduce sudden changes in steering from driving over rocks, holes, etc.

They also improve the life of ball joints, and are proven to be beneficial in the event of a front tire blow out. However, you shouldn't use a stabilizer to mask a steering problem. You should be able to drive down the road with no stabilizer without any wheel shimmy, vibration, shaking, etc.

StubEx also brings up a valid point about liability.
 
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Removing the rear sway bar will increase understeer on the street. The vehicle will have a tendency to plow in corners. How significant the change is depends on many factors. I agree with the rest that there is very little, if anything, to be gained in offroad performance from removing it. If you are determined to do it, maybe you can experiment in an open parking lot or other flat area without obstructions. See how much the Jeep tends to plow before and after and whether you are concerned by the difference. Probably the easiest way is to just try turning in a large, constant diameter circle and slowly increase your speed until you don't like it.
 

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Probably the easiest way is to just try turning in a large, constant diameter circle and slowly increase your speed until you don't like it.
or flip it ;)

A better test would be take some corners hard or make some sudden turns. I'm betting you won't like it much. Then think about what will happen if you have to swerve to avoid another vehicle/person/etc.
 
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or flip it ;)

A better test would be take some corners hard or make some sudden turns. I'm betting you won't like it much. Then think about what will happen if you have to swerve to avoid another vehicle/person/etc.
I've done a lot of skid pad testing in the past. Usually the vehicle will either push off the radius (if it understeers) or it will start to tighten the radius just before starting to spin (if it oversteers). Of course all testing that will make the steer characteristics of a vehicle apparent must occur near the limits of adhesion, so being careful is always the first order of business. I would argue that hard cornering or sudden turns are equally prone to producing a negative outcome, especially if attempted on public streets. Probably the best thing to do is just leave the sway bar connected and enjoy the Jeep!
 

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This is actually a two pronged question. I've been thinking about removing the rear sway bar to get more axle articulation. Has anyone done this? If I choose to keep it off, will it be undrivable on the road/hwy? It's not my everyday driver but I do drive to trail destinations. Pros and cons.

Second part. Steering stabilizers. I noticed some of you have removed them.
How necessary are they?

Feed back appreciated

RobV

4 door rubi, RE 4 1/2 long arm kit with acos spacers on 37's
You could also check to see if your shocks limit your travel. I am using Edelbrock extreme travel for maximum articulation. It makes a big difference.

If you want more flex get ORE's Cantilever system & Coil over’s in the front.


Good Luck
 

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try it, if it sucks put it back.

every pickup ive driven had no rear swaybar and they worked fine.

if you crash, sue me
 

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Discussion Starter #15
OK, thanks everyone for your input. So the consensus is the Jeep is still drivable without the rear swaybar however; compromises stability in an emergency maneuver which could prove life threatening among other things. I agree completely.

As for offroad performance gains, it seems minimal at best. I'm going to try it offroad and see for myself just for the heck of it.

Just to be clear, I think I have a very capable setup as it is. As I said before, the suggestion came from a mechanic who has worked on my Jeep. I'm always looking to improve things where ever I can.

BTW, For the beer drinkers out there. Full Sail Limited Edition Lager. Outstanding. :beer:

Also, I think the Currie Antirocks are pretty cool:smokin:
 

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I really dig the antirocks. You can tell the difference being connected and flexing as the antirocks work to keep your jeep more level. You can kinda see it here...not the best pic sorry. I have 30" long shocks and they flex completely out now front and rear.



 

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I tried my TJ with no rear bar and hated it.

The tub of the Jeep will fall with gravity and not stay in line with the rear axle. So on any sort of side hill, big rock etc the tub will fall downhill instead of keeping in line with the axle. Creates a VERY unstable jeep on the trail.

The whole point of the sway bar is to transfer body movement into traction. It works on the trail for that purpose too. You will have more control and more traction with the rear bar hooked up.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I tried my TJ with no rear bar and hated it.

The tub of the Jeep will fall with gravity and not stay in line with the rear axle. So on any sort of side hill, big rock etc the tub will fall downhill instead of keeping in line with the axle. Creates a VERY unstable jeep on the trail.

The whole point of the sway bar is to transfer body movement into traction. It works on the trail for that purpose too. You will have more control and more traction with the rear bar hooked up.
Just came back from "The Con" . The rig that was in front of me most of the time ran without a rear swaybar. I saw first hand the tub drop like a dump bed whenever he went off camber. It looked like an amusement park ride. That was enough to convince me to leave it alone.
 
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