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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know of an easier way to remove the rear brake rotors? I've lossened up the E-brake adjuster, used Blaster on the hub, and beat the shit out of it with a 2lb sledge. Still cant get it to even budge.
 

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That's about all you can do. Just keep hitting alternate sides with a bfh. I used a 4# for hundreds of BMW rotors.


Sent via paper airplane
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yep, I'm hitting between the studs and the brake retainers are off. I had hoped that there might be a better way then beating the crap out of it.
 

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stupid question, but did you remove the caliper?

Also, if you need to loosen the e-brake cables...they can be removed with a pair of needle nose pliers. easy

I replaced all my rotors at one point..they just fell off after removing the caliper..don't know why your having issues...

post a picture of both sides of your set up.
 

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stupid question, but did you remove the caliper?

Also, if you need to loosen the e-brake cables...they can be removed with a pair of needle nose pliers. easy

I replaced all my rotors at one point..they just fell off after removing the caliper..don't know why your having issues...

post a picture of both sides of your set up.
Cuz he's from the East Coast where they put shit all over the roads in the winter and everything rusts together. :eek:
 

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Anyone know of an easier way to remove the rear brake rotors? I've lossened up the E-brake adjuster, used Blaster on the hub, and beat the shit out of it with a 2lb sledge. Still cant get it to even budge.
Nah just keep at it. I'm in Michigan so I know your pain, you can try and fit a hydraulic puller, but that's about it
 

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i have done many brake jobs in the past and by far the rears on my JK were the worst to do. It all has to do with the stupid e-brake set up. I had such a huge lip of rust on the indide of the rotor that no amount of star wheel adjustment would allow these things to come off. Lots and lots of hammering the living shit out of the rotors finally did the trick. Now every time i rotate the tires i take the extra time to remove the rotor and sand down the lip on the inside of the rotor...a little preventative maintenance makes changing these a piece of cake.
 

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East cost, first replaced the rears at 45K miles. No problems getting the rotors off. I put some anti-seize on the backs before replacing to avoid any problems in the future.

E-brake is a useless piece of shit, won't hold the jeep still on level ground in a breeze. Besides, I got an auto trans.
 

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Yep, I'm hitting between the studs and the brake retainers are off. I had hoped that there might be a better way then beating the crap out of it.
I never understood why techs did it this way. I am assuming you are replacing the rotor? It seems to work pretty poorly and usually the only option with drums, but with discs it just seems counter-productive.

Hit the rotor OFF the studs. From the backside, where the caliper rides. Rotate the rotor and hit it again. A steel hammer will destroy the rotor, but I bet it'll come off much faster.
 

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I usually start by going around the center of the rotor/hub with a wire-wheel. Then I hit it with some penetrating oil. While that's doing it's thing I crawl underneither the vehicle and back off the adjusting screw as much as possible. If I can't remove the rotor at that point I lay down on the ground and hit the back side of the rotor with my rubber-faced dead blow hammer as hard as I can. That usually does the trick. It also doesn't fuck up the rotor at all.

If the parking brake shoes are really seated in the hat of the rotor not allowing for removal, then you might be able to cut the ends off the pins that hold the shoes to the backing plates. I'm not sure how the JK is setup, but I've done this on other vehicles. It allowed me to get enough access to remove the adjuster, followed by the brake shoes.
 

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HOW TO EASILY REMOVE REAR ROTORS...

Here is how I get them off, 1st off, beating them off is just plain silly. (unless you have anger issues then commence banging)

1st-remove caliper and hardware. 2nd-you have to dial down the e-brake adjuster if applicable)

Here's the MAGIC-

I go back to 70-80's and beyond technology, as I do still have an 80's CJ.

Do you remember when all the old rear drums came with two tapped out screw holes? What we did was insert two bolts and screw them into the drum, bolts hit the axle flange and the drum was forced off of the shoes. The issue is the same today with the hat in rotor brake pads have etched inside and it needs to be forced or "pressed" off just like the old time drums.

So here is the easy fix...drill two holes, let's say 9 and 3 o'clock (doesn't matter as long as they are across from each other) stay inside of the lugs as you want to hit the flange underneath. Drill out just deep enough to penetrate the rotor. (you will probably put two small dimples in flange, won't hurt anything) I strongly suggest using some tap/drill oil, not necessary but saves drill bits.

Now tap both holes with flat head tap and place two grade 5 or 8 bolts and crank down on them uniformly. I think I use 3/8 course tap. Provided your taps were good, you will see the hat in rotor slowly pull off. Sometimes I just use impact but it kills your tapped holes, if you want to reuse, those holes come in handy for next change! Or...

In a rush situation, I just use two taps, no bolts and hat in rotor comes off cranking down on taps!

HELPFUL TIP....drill and tap 2 new holes on NEW ROTORS so next time you can get off super easy.

I do this on every car/truck I work on and my wrists thank me...:)
 

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Here is how I get them off, 1st off, beating them off is just plain silly. (unless you have anger issues then commence banging)

1st-remove caliper and hardware. 2nd-you have to dial down the e-brake adjuster if applicable)

Here's the MAGIC-

I go back to 70-80's and beyond technology, as I do still have an 80's CJ.

Do you remember when all the old rear drums came with two tapped out screw holes? What we did was insert two bolts and screw them into the drum, bolts hit the axle flange and the drum was forced off of the shoes. The issue is the same today with the hat in rotor brake pads have etched inside and it needs to be forced or "pressed" off just like the old time drums.

So here is the easy fix...drill two holes, let's say 9 and 3 o'clock (doesn't matter as long as they are across from each other) stay inside of the lugs as you want to hit the flange underneath. Drill out just deep enough to penetrate the rotor. (you will probably put two small dimples in flange, won't hurt anything) I strongly suggest using some tap/drill oil, not necessary but saves drill bits.

Now tap both holes with flat head tap and place two grade 5 or 8 bolts and crank down on them uniformly. I think I use 3/8 course tap. Provided your taps were good, you will see the hat in rotor slowly pull off. Sometimes I just use impact but it kills your tapped holes, if you want to reuse, those holes come in handy for next change! Or...

In a rush situation, I just use two taps, no bolts and hat in rotor comes off cranking down on taps!

HELPFUL TIP....drill and tap 2 new holes on NEW ROTORS so next time you can get off super easy.

I do this on every car/truck I work on and my wrists thank me...:)
That's an interesting idea. I remember some of the older Ford vehicles had threaded holes in the rotor so you could use a puller on them. I don't think they were through holes though. I think they were blind holes and somewhere around 1/4-20 in size.
 

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Lug Stud Replacement and Removing a Rotor from the Rear of a Manual

Just spent 5 hours this weekend replacing a $2 lug stud on my passenger's side rear wheel. Wanted to share some lessons learned to save one of you the pain. I have a manual, and that's important. The reason it is important is because the emergency brake grips the inside of the rotor. This diagram proved very helpful:



When you lift a rear wheel in 2WD, it will roll. Thus, your natural tendency is to hit the e-brake to keep it still. Unfortunately, now your rear rotor is stuck and no amount of WD40 or rubber mallet can remedy that (for good reason). You need to relax the e-brake - that happens with the star wheel that sits vertically behind the rotor (there's a rubber gasket that can be pulled away to give you and a short screwdriver access to turn it click by click - you will need to tighten it back when you are done). In this image, it's part number 9.



So back up in the story a bit. To start getting a rotor off of a manual,
put your truck in 4WD and chock your wheels before you do anything else, including jacking it up - your transmission will keep you parked.

Next, make sure your emergency brake is off. Then jack up and remove the wheel and retaining rings on your lug studs.

Then use the 18mm socket to remove the 2 bolts from your brake caliper and pull it off. IMPORTANT - do not mash your brakes with the caliper off or you will curse a lot trying to get it back on.

Once the caliper is off (might want to set some boards down for it to rest on so it doesn't dangle by the brake cable), see if the rotor will shimmy off with gentle persuasion, but don't force it. If it does, fantastic. If not, pull the rubber grommet (shaped like a long pill) and use a short screwdriver to turn the star gear on the vertical post in the diagram. Once it is loose, the rotor should move more freely and come off with less effort.

Whether you are changing the rotor, a lug stud, or just looking around, sorting out the e-brake's hold on the inside of your rotor is an epiphany if you are using a dead-blow mallet and getting nowhere.

Once you are done, carefully follow these instructions in reverse to get your assembly safely back together and roadworthy. You may have to pump your brakes a time or to to repressurize them after having the caliper off.

Test your emergency brake as well. It never hurts to write your steps out on a piece of paper to keep yourself from having to guess. When you're messing with your braking system, better safe than sorry. Hope that helps

o|||||||o

Chris
 

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Hi! Changing the rear rotors on my 2010 JK, and am stuck with removing the rotor itself. I have the caliper and bracket removed. I've located the rubber piece on the back side of the tire. Does the spring that extends from inside the disc need to be removed. And are there any other retaining clips holding the tire on. Lived in MI for 6 years with the car. First time I've changed rear brakes system (pads and rotors) > 111,000 miles. These rotors on rusted on. I've been spraying with Liquid Wrench thru out the day, but that was mostly to get the rear caliper bracket (adapter) off--that shit was a bitch, broke the ratchet-- You need a breaker bar and and cheater bar, but be advised if you have a 2-dr, the space for clearance to remove the 18mm boltsThe space is very narrow-Unless you jack it to the sky, you don't have much clearance- ½ drive was too big, but ⅜ drive fit nicely, but not really strong enough to brake the seal-these are torqued to 55 ft. lbs. As for the front--make sure you use a breaker bar, and a ½ have drive + 13/16 inch socket, I think a 21mm works as well. These front bolts are tongued to 120 ft. lbs- I had to enlist my dad for his strength:) Sooooo..., I want to make sure I don't damage some other parts in the process of removing the rotor. And all the information on here is absolutely life-saving--I'd never of thought of changing my own rotors (actually I didn't even know what a rotor was, let alone a caliper). So thanks for all the great advise!!
 
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