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Discussion Starter #1
Will be camping inside the 4-Dr, looking to buy a double sleeping bag for the next trip where we expect temperatures in the 20s overnight. Reading some things people are saying that even if a bag is rated to 15* that it won't be good enough because the ratings are lies.

Anyone have a decent double sleeping bag? Prefer one that will do well on our below freezing trip and potentially be useable in the spring time too.

Any advice??
 

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Here is an article by Brett Woods a vendor here.
http://www.jeepswag.com/blog/
Give him a call, he will take good care of you.
Phone: (626)Trails1
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Mike, read the article and loved the information. Sadly though, they don't carry any doubles when I followed the link to their sleeping bag page. They only carry single-person bags.
 

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if you are going to stay inside the cab it wont be as bad since there wont be any wind. personally i would just use a couple of quilts.
 

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if you are going to stay inside the cab it wont be as bad since there wont be any wind. personally i would just use a couple of quilts.
And you could always puss out and run the heater if it gets really unbearable... That heater is like a :flamethrowingsmiley
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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Just make sure you have a quality sleep pad. Don't use an air mattress or you will freeze your balls off.

I have a -7 deg bag (20 F) and I have been comfortable in some pretty cold situations. Cover your head and you will be good to go.
 

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Just thought of something else,


Buy 2 bags but with zippers on opposite sides. You can get a really good bag for solo trips, and just zip them together when you need too.

It will open your options for colder weather bags.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was actually planning on an air mattress, but I'm going to layer a spare blanket between the mattress and sleeping bag for added insulation. Do you think this will be an issue still even with the extra layer between the mattress and sleeping bag?
 

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I was actually planning on an air mattress, but I'm going to layer a spare blanket between the mattress and sleeping bag for added insulation. Do you think this will be an issue still even with the extra layer between the mattress and sleeping bag?
It might help, but I have found that an air mattress doesn't insulate well. I am always cold using an air matress when compared to a sleeping pad.
 

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There are lots of bags made as solo units but are also built to zip together to make a double. This is the route I'd go.

I have a couple of Colemans rated to around 0 that I got around 10 yrs ago. Work great in either configuration.
 

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There are lots of bags made as solo units but are also built to zip together to make a double. This is the route I'd go.

I have a couple of Colemans rated to around 0 that I got around 10 yrs ago. Work great in either configuration.
If you can find some that zip together that is a great idea.

Also, instead of a heated blanket draining your battery or using gas to run your Jeep's heater (and possibly asphyxiating yourself) look at one of these:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Coleman-SportCat-Catalytic-Heater/13228604

Even though they are catalytic, you should leave a window cracked open a bit. This will help prevent condensation in the cab as well. I've used mine inside my tent many times without an issue. I don't leave it running all night, I just let it heat up the air enough to take the hard chill off.
 

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Been doing a ton of research on cold temperature camping and what I found has been really informative. What companies like Therm-A-Rest are saying is that the bottom insulation in a bag (i.e. - what you sleep on) is greatly reduced by compression. The more the bottom layer of insulation is compressed the less insulating it is.

To avoid this Therm-A-Rest recommends an insulating sleep pad with a down quilt on top. They claim this provides the most efficient thermal barrier available. I can't factually confirm this as my experience with this type of system is strictly theoretical but from the explanations provided it does make sense.

I'm currently looking into a Luxury Map mattress from Therm-A-Rest paired with their Alpine down blanket which is rated to 35* F. This specific system, although expensive, is supposed to be pretty damn good.

:)
 
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