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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm using a plasmaglow switch with my warn power interrupt. The interrupt kit has a 5amp inline fuse and the switch is rated to 10amps without a relay. My concern is the preterminated wires coming off the switch are fairly light gauge while the ones in the kit are heavier. Maybe 14 vs 22...(guessing there). Can I just splice them together or should I remove the wires n thin spade connectors that came on the switch and crimp thin spade connectors to the wires from the kit to attach to the switch??? Does it matter given the amperages??? Thanks!!
 

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So I'm using a plasmaglow switch with my warn power interrupt. The interrupt kit has a 5amp inline fuse and the switch is rated to 10amps without a relay. My concern is the preterminated wires coming off the switch are fairly light gauge while the ones in the kit are heavier. Maybe 14 vs 22...(guessing there). Can I just splice them together or should I remove the wires n thin spade connectors that came on the switch and crimp thin spade connectors to the wires from the kit to attach to the switch??? Does it matter given the amperages??? Thanks!!
Well it would end up being a fusible link.... But if it was me I'd go with the 14 and just use a fuse....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
14 gauge wire and a fuse inline with it
Ok... The interrupt kit has 14 gauge wire with it along with a 5amp inline fuse already. So basically I should get rid of the lighter wire on the switch and put a female connector that fits on the 14 gauge wire to plug onto the switch. Correct? What I don't get is if the switch and its wire are rated for 10amps and the heavier wire that powers the switch has a 5amp fuse, why get rid of the lighter wire instead of just splicing them together? Not arguing a point by any means, just trying to understand better why it should be done that way. Thanks for the responses!
 

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Ok... The interrupt kit has 14 gauge wire with it along with a 5amp inline fuse already. So basically I should get rid of the lighter wire on the switch and put a female connector that fits on the 14 gauge wire to plug onto the switch. Correct? What I don't get is if the switch and its wire are rated for 10amps and the heavier wire that powers the switch has a 5amp fuse, why get rid of the lighter wire instead of just splicing them together? Not arguing a point by any means, just trying to understand better why it should be done that way. Thanks for the responses!
I know this may be old news, but I thought I'd throw in my $0.02

If your kit came with 14 gauge wire, it's best to use that in the rest of the circuit as well. It's always safest to use heavier gauge wire and a properly sized fuse.

If you are correct in your guess of 22 gauge wire, that is only rated for 5 amps or so (according to the above chart) if it's enclosed (not in open air where it gets plenty of cooling). A wire should always be rated at higher amperage than the protecting fuse. So, a 5 amp fuse should be protecting wire rated at more than 5 amps, that way the fuse will always be the first thing to fail.

Using the smaller wire probably would have worked ok, but it's always better safe than sorry.

If that switch and its included wiring was meant to power a standard 30A relay, that is around a 1/4 amp load. So it would make sense that they use small wiring. You are powering a higher amp solenoid, that likely has a higher amp control coil as well. Not likely what that wire was intended for. Would it have worked, like I said, probably so. But still, best to use the size wiring supplied with the actual load you will be powering with the switch.

Hope that makes sense.

If the wire is larger than 22 gauge, it would be less of an issue, but my personal recommendation would still be to go with the 14 gauge to keep the circuit wiring the same. I'm a bit picky about my wiring though. I generally go with a size larger than needed, just to be safe and to minimize voltage drop.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I know this may be old news, but I thought I'd throw in my $0.02

If your kit came with 14 gauge wire, it's best to use that in the rest of the circuit as well. It's always safest to use heavier gauge wire and a properly sized fuse.

If you are correct in your guess of 22 gauge wire, that is only rated for 5 amps or so (according to the above chart) if it's enclosed (not in open air where it gets plenty of cooling). A wire should always be rated at higher amperage than the protecting fuse. So, a 5 amp fuse should be protecting wire rated at more than 5 amps, that way the fuse will always be the first thing to fail.

Using the smaller wire probably would have worked ok, but it's always better safe than sorry.

If that switch and its included wiring was meant to power a standard 30A relay, that is around a 1/4 amp load. So it would make sense that they use small wiring. You are powering a higher amp solenoid, that likely has a higher amp control coil as well. Not likely what that wire was intended for. Would it have worked, like I said, probably so. But still, best to use the size wiring supplied with the actual load you will be powering with the switch.

Hope that makes sense.

If the wire is larger than 22 gauge, it would be less of an issue, but my personal recommendation would still be to go with the 14 gauge to keep the circuit wiring the same. I'm a bit picky about my wiring though. I generally go with a size larger than needed, just to be safe and to minimize voltage drop.

Thank you!! That's what I did. Desoldered the wires on the switch and added the appropriate connectors on the wires from the kit. Seemed to work out fine. A bit tedious but glad I did it that way.
 
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