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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Painless #70107 7-Circuit Fuse Block installation in 2015 Jeep JK Wrangler

Rather than the more expensive weatherproof option with the lid, I chose the "open" 70107 because I planned to mount mine in the interior, so didn't need the weatherproof feature.

After some looking, I located a good place to mount the Painless unit behind the glove box where I found a threaded stud on the firewall, and where it wouldn’t be in any occupant’s way.


1. The glove box removes easily, with no tools, by simply opening it, flexing the sides so that the molded-in retaining legs clear the dash, and hinging downward. Set it aside.

2. As mentioned above, on the firewall behind the glove box, I found a threaded stud (which anchors the HVAC?). At Home Depot, I had gotten a bag of 2" L-brackets. Technically, they are called "Corner Braces" by Everbilt (SKU# 339 695). Prior to any assembly, I did a dry-fit of the bracket over the stud, and realized that I should enlarge the bracket’s end hole with my drill.

HINT - I discovered this later, but it could save someone time: Under the hood, there are threaded studs projecting from the heater’s mounts, just opposite from where you’ll be working under the dash. Those studs are the same size & threads, so could be used to select the proper nut w/o working in the confined space. I think it was 5/16, but honestly, I just went to my can full of spare nuts, and fished-out what I needed.

3. I screwed-together two L-brackets so that they were joined to make a sort of “square Z” shape. That is, with the outer (end) legs pointing in opposite directions.

4. I pre-assembled the Painless block to the leg of the non-drilled bracket leg, using nuts & screws.

http://s300.photobucket.com/user/jjsegr/media/Jeep Projects/IMG_3383_zpsd3rhrzzm.jpg.html

5. At this point, I also soldered an extra few feet of wire onto the block’s ground wire – enough to reach to the side of the passenger’s footwell, and added a connector soldered on the free end.

6. For once, my small hands were a benefit, because I could get my fingers to start the nut onto the stud on the firewall. After the nut was started, I was able to get at it with a long ¼” drive extension & socket to finish tightening the nut. A larger person may struggle more.

http://s300.photobucket.com/user/jjsegr/media/Jeep Projects/IMG_0004_zpssxzvoo9m.jpg.html


7. I separated the red (to battery) and pink (to fuse module) wires from the rest in the bundle. I put a small piece of electrical tape on the end of each one of the rest of the wires, and then coiled them into a convenient size, tied them together with small zip-ties., and tucked them out of the way under where the glove box will be re-installed. They’ll stay there until put into future service. With the block mounted in this position, the fuses are out of the way, facing towards you, next to the glove box opening.

8. Next was to figure how to get the red and pink wires into the engine compartment. I spent a good bit of time puzzling over this. Others have gone through a grommet on the driver’s side. I finally decided to drill a hole to the right of where the heater hoses pass through the firewall. I was lucky, and the location was good. I stopped drilling once I was through the metal, so that I didn’t cut through the padding on the firewall. From the inside, I put a rubber grommet around the drilled hole before passing the wire through. If anyone had been around, they may have learned some new words, at this point. My first hole was relatively small, and I ended re-drilling a size larger, to get the grommet to seat, properly. Due to the small wire passage, I put a film of grease on the wires, to help them slip through the grommet.

http://s300.photobucket.com/user/jjsegr/media/Jeep Projects/IMG_0001_zpsydlafgv5.jpg.html

9. Under the hood, I popped the bundles of factory cables off the firewall and pulled forward on the insulation pad. (I used a flat pry bar to hold the pad away from the firewall as I fed the wires from under the dash. I pulled them through, and they were concealed/protected between the firewall and the insulation. I led both wires to the passenger-side corner, and then routed them along the fender well. I pushed the cables back into position on the firewall. Some of those “Christmas tree” fasteners seem to have gotten tired, so I may have to replace them, some day.

10. I routed the ground wire over to the right (passenger) side where I used one of the two existing ground points, there.

11. I chose to mount the relay on the fender well by drilling two holes and using the two sheet metal screws provided in the kit. I measured and cut the red wire, to the relay. Per the instructions, I used the rest of the red wire for the connection from the relay to the battery. I soldered and warmed the shrink wrap on all of the connectors. I saw in another write-up that the relay was just taped in place near the battery, and worked fine. There are a lot of different places & ways to mount the relay.

12. The pink wire goes into the power control center(PCC), or whatever they call fuse blocks, now. I used a testing light to find a “switched” fuse, and puts a brass jumper (provided) on the hot leg of the fuse. I drilled a hole into the side of the PCC for the wire to pass through. Honestly, the pink wire is such a fine gauge that it may not be at risk of being pinched by having the cap snapped over it. I sealed the hole with a dot of RTV caulk.

13. Back inside the cabin, I used the test light to confirm that a wire from one of the “switched” circuits was hot, and only when the key was on.

14. Re-install the glove box, put-away the tools, vacuum the bits of wire, etc., and call it done.

Except in the fuse block, wherever I made electrical connections, I put a light film of conductive grease on the connectors before I attaced them.

Thr Painless kit is pretty complete. I recall adding only: (2) L-brackets, (3) screws & nuts to joing the brackets, one nut for the firewall mount, a couple more electrical connectors, solder & heat-shrink, electrical tape, conductive grease.

I have since installed heated seats, using one of the seven circuits. Everything works great.

I have photos, which I’ve attempted to load. Please yell if I did something wrong with using Photobucket.
 

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Painless #70107 7-Circuit Fuse Block installation in 2015 Jeep JK Wrangler

Rather than the more expensive weatherproof option with the lid, I chose the "open" 70107 because I planned to mount mine in the interior, so didn't need the weatherproof feature.

After some looking, I located a good place to mount the Painless unit behind the glove box where I found a threaded stud on the firewall, and where it wouldn’t be in any occupant’s way.


1. The glove box removes easily, with no tools, by simply opening it, flexing the sides so that the molded-in retaining legs clear the dash, and hinging downward. Set it aside.

2. As mentioned above, on the firewall behind the glove box, I found a threaded stud (which anchors the HVAC?). At Home Depot, I had gotten a bag of 2" L-brackets. Technically, they are called "Corner Braces" by Everbilt (SKU# 339 695). Prior to any assembly, I did a dry-fit of the bracket over the stud, and realized that I should enlarge the bracket’s end hole with my drill.

HINT - I discovered this later, but it could save someone time: Under the hood, there are threaded studs projecting from the heater’s mounts, just opposite from where you’ll be working under the dash. Those studs are the same size & threads, so could be used to select the proper nut w/o working in the confined space. I think it was 5/16, but honestly, I just went to my can full of spare nuts, and fished-out what I needed.

3. I screwed-together two L-brackets so that they were joined to make a sort of “square Z” shape. That is, with the outer (end) legs pointing in opposite directions.

4. I pre-assembled the Painless block to the leg of the non-drilled bracket leg, using nuts & screws.



5. At this point, I also soldered an extra few feet of wire onto the block’s ground wire – enough to reach to the side of the passenger’s footwell, and added a connector soldered on the free end.

6. For once, my small hands were a benefit, because I could get my fingers to start the nut onto the stud on the firewall. After the nut was started, I was able to get at it with a long ¼” drive extension & socket to finish tightening the nut. A larger person may struggle more.




7. I separated the red (to battery) and pink (to fuse module) wires from the rest in the bundle. I put a small piece of electrical tape on the end of each one of the rest of the wires, and then coiled them into a convenient size, tied them together with small zip-ties., and tucked them out of the way under where the glove box will be re-installed. They’ll stay there until put into future service. With the block mounted in this position, the fuses are out of the way, facing towards you, next to the glove box opening.

8. Next was to figure how to get the red and pink wires into the engine compartment. I spent a good bit of time puzzling over this. Others have gone through a grommet on the driver’s side. I finally decided to drill a hole to the right of where the heater hoses pass through the firewall. I was lucky, and the location was good. I stopped drilling once I was through the metal, so that I didn’t cut through the padding on the firewall. From the inside, I put a rubber grommet around the drilled hole before passing the wire through. If anyone had been around, they may have learned some new words, at this point. My first hole was relatively small, and I ended re-drilling a size larger, to get the grommet to seat, properly. Due to the small wire passage, I put a film of grease on the wires, to help them slip through the grommet.



9. Under the hood, I popped the bundles of factory cables off the firewall and pulled forward on the insulation pad. (I used a flat pry bar to hold the pad away from the firewall as I fed the wires from under the dash. I pulled them through, and they were concealed/protected between the firewall and the insulation. I led both wires to the passenger-side corner, and then routed them along the fender well. I pushed the cables back into position on the firewall. Some of those “Christmas tree” fasteners seem to have gotten tired, so I may have to replace them, some day.

10. I routed the ground wire over to the right (passenger) side where I used one of the two existing ground points, there.

11. I chose to mount the relay on the fender well by drilling two holes and using the two sheet metal screws provided in the kit. I measured and cut the red wire, to the relay. Per the instructions, I used the rest of the red wire for the connection from the relay to the battery. I soldered and warmed the shrink wrap on all of the connectors. I saw in another write-up that the relay was just taped in place near the battery, and worked fine. There are a lot of different places & ways to mount the relay.

12. The pink wire goes into the power control center(PCC), or whatever they call fuse blocks, now. I used a testing light to find a “switched” fuse, and puts a brass jumper (provided) on the hot leg of the fuse. I drilled a hole into the side of the PCC for the wire to pass through. Honestly, the pink wire is such a fine gauge that it may not be at risk of being pinched by having the cap snapped over it. I sealed the hole with a dot of RTV caulk.

13. Back inside the cabin, I used the test light to confirm that a wire from one of the “switched” circuits was hot, and only when the key was on.

14. Re-install the glove box, put-away the tools, vacuum the bits of wire, etc., and call it done.

Except in the fuse block, wherever I made electrical connections, I put a light film of conductive grease on the connectors before I attaced them.

Thr Painless kit is pretty complete. I recall adding only: (2) L-brackets, (3) screws & nuts to joing the brackets, one nut for the firewall mount, a couple more electrical connectors, solder & heat-shrink, electrical tape, conductive grease.

I have since installed heated seats, using one of the seven circuits. Everything works great.
Thanks for sharing...

I have photos, which I’ve attempted to load. Please yell if I did something wrong with using Photobucket.
Just go back to photobucket and use the direct link option, change the [u r l] [/u r l] to
or just copy and paste my fixed links ;)
 
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