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I need some help. I'm moving to a new apartment complex. This one is on a small river. The cool thing is that they have a kayak input and kayak storage rack.
Thought it would be cool for the wife and I to do (and fish with my son)
I'm looking for a 2 person Non-inflatable kayak. The reason is, the storage is for non-inflatables only.
I've never owned one, so I need some input on brands, models, etc.
 

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I am also looking to buy a pair - one for me and one for the boy (8).

I have been looking at the Wilderness brand... a 14' x 28" for me and an 11' for the kid

I have a boat ramp less than a half mile from my driveway and I would love to make good use of it.

Interested to see what people are using.
 

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Me too. I just stumbled across this site..haven't looked it over too much but it looks promising.

http://www.paddling.net/
That's a great website!
I have a Seaward Passat G3 (3 seater), a Folbot Greenland 2 (a folding tandom), and a little Necky for just farting around in the Sound.

Necky, Wilderness Systems, Old Town Kayaks make good kayaks. It really depends on how much you guys are looking to spend and what kind of waters you'll be in. There are a hundred options.
 

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I like the Perception Kayaks. A "decent" one will run you $500-700 new. Spend the money for a decent paddle (more $ than you think), and get a light weight wet suit if you plan on using the kayak other than June, july and august.. The waters cold, and it will take your breath away (die)
 

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If this is your first kayak and you are just getting it to paddle around with the family I am not sure it matters which brand you get. I had a Perception years ago and they make a very nice kayak but a girl I was dating at the time had an off brand that cost half of what the Perception did and there was nothing wrong with it at all.
 

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I am looking at getting two kayaks soon. Places like REI rent kayaks. I plan on trying out the various types they have available prior to purchasing. Try before you buy!
 

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I don't have any experience with tandem kayaks (though I had a canoe. The first time I got in a yak I never wanted to be in a canoe again and promptly sold it) Now I've got 4 kayaks on a custom built trailer!

Anyways just a couple things if you have never been in kayak:

Virtually any brand will do you just fine. You aren't entering whitewater races. Some might be a little more comfy or have better accessories, but generally dimensions are the most important. (also a more expensive boat will probably go straighter on its own than a cheapo) I will say that Wilderness Systems has a sweet very adjustable seat system that will keep you comfy longer!

The slower the water, the longer kayak you want. Sure a 7 foot boat is just a couple hundred bucks but they are made for moving water. Try to get across a lake in one and you'll quickly find its VERY tiring. On the flip side, its difficult to turn an 18 footer in a moving river! All four of mine are 12', a decent compromise. You won't set any speed records, but not too taxing to cover a distance--and fish along the way too!

Also, the wider the better for novices and fishing. 30" wide cockpits are very stable. If you DO happen to roll on over, prepare to swim. Those badboys fill uber fast and are rather impossible to drain on the water. That being said, I have had atleast a half dozen people spend their very first time in one of my kayaks, and NEVER had a flip.

Josh

2 12' Old Town Vapors
2 12' Wilderness Systems Pungo 120

 

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FWIW I have the inflatable sevylar 2 person riveryak. PO installed a third seat. Wife, son and I all fit. Son now has his own (Lifetime kiddyyak $75 and at six can paddle miles in it). I can push or pull him too, wife has the perception pescadore 8' (on sale 195). all three fit on my roof rack and I can perform "airplane" rescues from mine. Solo with the seat in the middle the inflatable turns very fast and less affected by wind than you might think. The pescadore is wetter but has a solid hinged seatback. Get the best seat you can....inflatable are comfy, with a jeep and a kayak you do not need a boat ramp. primary paddling condtions should dictate design (length, weight, sit on top ocean and self draining river, or artic all very dift. Rudder or not, pedals and sails all options these days. Like said above go someplace that rents and try a few designs. waay more options in boats than jeeps...some kayaks do not role anymore.... paddling.com is great

no grammar is not my thing
 

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We just got a Nucanoe Frontier a couple of months ago. It's very versatile. We're loving it! Ordered it the Wildcat Creek Outfitters.
 

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We always call the tandem kayaks "floating divorces" =)

Do y'all have much experience kayaking? If so, ignore me!

I find when one has more skill than the other, a canoe is better - the less-skilled one can be in the front, and provide some additional power when needed, without impacting the overall function of the steerer in the rear. In a kayak, your timing has to be better, and you have to be more synchronized, otherwise the one in the front should just pull up their paddle as the difference in steering ability is minimized between the two... Now, some people make it work just fine!

I kayak a lot, and my lady rarely - she generally has a bad time and feels less comfortable/secure in two-seater SOTK (sit on top kayak), but really enjoys canoes and hybrids with me. To be honest, it may just be the presence of a gunwale with her.

If you're going with a 'yak, I'd start with a SOTK rather than a SINK (sit inside kayak, i.e. the ones you use a spray skirt with) - especially if going tandem, they're easy to do recovery and wet entries in, and with two wet entry is much easier. They're also way better for fishing (we use SOTs pretty much exclusively down here for bay/marsh fishing) - it's not uncommon to see guys rolling through the bays down here with a cooler, live well, and a truckload of gear on their 'yaks. Lol.

I'm a big fan of Wilderness Systems - I have an older Tarpon 160i I've used for nearly seven years that has stood up to abuse and saved my life on a few occasions! Echoing what was said earlier, shorter boats are better for small rivers, but since you're not white watering it, you'll be fine with nearly anything.

Above and beyond all SKIP the Academy specials, Pelican, etc. are nothing but leaky vessels waiting to put you and your family's health and life in danger. Buy something reputable, or get used to bailing water.

!c
 

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I'm looking for one too. For hubby, who's never kayaked before, but would like one for fishing creeks and small rivers. Particularly the Bass Pro Shop Ascent FS10. It got good reviews on the site, anybody here have one?
 

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I've got a 16' two man with adjustable seats, foot pegs and adjustable back angle. there's also a seat that snaps on in the middle of the kayak. available with a two man skirt. I'm not at home right now but will be tomorrow and will let ya'll know what make it is. I can't for the life of me remember. some pics.

EDIT: Wilderness Pamlico
 

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Back to the top. Still haven't bought a kayak but I'm determined to get one. Went Kayaking a few weeks ago with a rental and it was awesome. Did any of you all that were looking make a choice? What did you get?

I'm looking at the Emotion Mojo right now. Seems to have a lot of great features on it.
 

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I would not recommend a tandem. I read floating divorce and I would say that is true. She will stop paddling, but you sure as shit won't.

I had a cheap Pelican sit in. If your fishing, definitely get the sit on tops. More stable.

The recommendation for a good paddle is on the mark too. Don't skimp here, as te cheaper ones are heavier and push much less water.
 

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haha my Girlfriend and I tried a tandem once. It was NOT going well at all until we finally realized that she was sitting way to far forward. Once we got that straightened out we did fine after that.
 

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Longer kayaks glide farther. That may be a consideration if you have to paddle upstream.
Them short, fat ones are for going down stream in fast water where you need high maneuverability. They will wear you out on flat water.
 

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The best way to determine which type of Kayak is best for you to to try them out. I recommend you find a place that sells them and lets you try their product. If you can't find a try before you buy place visit a Kayak rental shop. I would recommend you try sit on top kayaks as well as sit in kayaks they both have very different characteristics. I tried both and ended up with a sit on top ocean kayak. I used in in the ocean, rivers, and back country swamps in south Georgia. The one I selected the Scrambler, had drain holes built into it that allowed water to enter and exit. This was primarily for the ocean when you get swamped by a wave the water would just run out. However, when sitting in the kayak I was always sitting in about an inch of water, even with plugs (scuppers) installed to stop up the holes. This was not an issue in the summer, but in the winter it was literally a pain in the @$$.
 

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warcop is right. There are a lot of factors which contribute to the performance of a kayak, from length and displacement, the amount of rocker, the chines, entry....

Then all these factors are affected by the weight and balance of the load. A kayak with low initial stability will feel "tippy" to a man, because he carries a greater percentage of his weight in his upper torso. So a boat you might hate, could be perfect for a woman.

The other factors to consider are the intended usage, where you will paddle (waves, wind...) and WEIGHT! Plastic kayaks are cheap and heavy. That weight affects transporting as well as on the water performance.

Might I suggest you look at a small recreational canoe? You can find light weight ones on the market.

Of all the boats I build for customers, the most popular is the small portage canoe. Small and light, with a fine entry transitioning to a moderate width. Add just enough rocker to make turning easy without significantly detracting from tracking. At 12-15 feet with a weight from 20-32 lbs, and with low enough gunnels to make it easy to paddle with a kayak paddle. To me, this is the perfect all around, recreational boat...





 
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