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Thread is closed due to disgruntled member, new thread with no attachment to this thread started.
 

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This has been very helpful to me as I do some light wireing. Thanks:beer:
 

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I have been doing my own wiring for years using these basic techniques. I must say your wiring 101 class was very well thought out and includes some very helpful information for people just starting out. You clearly answer a lot of questions that come up A LOT, maybe should be a sticky in this area or the library.
 

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Very nicely done!

Toss in WIRE as another section. Try to get the best you can afford. It is not much of an issue up front, but will be down the road, particularly if you are in the engine compartment, near the battery or drawing a lot of current. It doesn't hurt to oversize a little. And if possible, use tin plated copper instead of bare copper. This will help with long term corrosion issues.

Try a marine store instead of your local FLAPs for quality wire.
 

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Let's add on and make this a sticky :bounce:
 

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http://www.the12volt.com/

if you are unfimiliar with wiring this site has all the info tips and tricks that you could think of.

Also if you have the factory alarm you can take the wire from the hood pin, extend it and tap it into the purple wire right inside the driver side dash end piece that pops off so if the hood is opened the alarm will go off as it should have been done from the factory.

You can also run a pair of 55watt back up lights off the factory reverse light wire with no I'll effects. Been running mine for over a year and no issue and tested the draw with a volt meter and it didn't cause a drain surge.

As for wire connections, solder, electric grease, heat shrink tubing or the paint on tape stuff and I always go back and wrap with electrical tape for added protection. I installed custom and show stereo and alarm through my 20's and am very OCD so use your imagination.

When soldering it is just like brazing copper so you don't get a cold joint that corrodes:

strip the wire and then hold a wire in each hand and then twist them together where it look like the wire just had the insulation cut off and there is no need to wrap the wire over the insulation but no biggie if you do, don't forget to put heatshrink on before you twist them.

Let the solder iron get hot, place the tip against ( I like under) the twisted wire and occasionally touch the solder to the WIRE not the tip, when the wire is hot enough it will literally suck the solder into the wire and it will not take much, after it is all silver I will then slide the tip back and fourth to make sure it is good to go.

Wait for it to cool then apply grease if you want, just a little bit, then slide the heatshrink over and heat it. If it's not cool the end of the hs will srink and you can't get it over the wire.

Scotch locks and t-taps suck as they end up breaking the wire and the wiring in the jk is too thin as it is, butt or crimp connectors are great for quick fix but never make the long haul in moist or humid conditions unless you crimp then solder. I know many will argue this and give testimonials but at well over 2000 alarm installs and warranty work I can tell you what will last and what will not and I am the type when I install something I never want to have to go back and f... Tinker with it.

If I can ever help please let me know.
 

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No problem we all have to learn somewhere!
 

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That's a very nice intro. Allow me to add some info tasty bacon for you.
Bacon is delicious. It is truly the candy of meat. No fair and loving god
would ever hand down a law that deprived mankind of this delicious pork
product.
 

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In regards to the illustration above, how would someone wire driving lights to turn off when the brights are activated. Great write up, this has been very helpful.
 

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Can anyone explain further into different switches and thier installation. Maybe some info on momentary, SPDT, DPDT, and the like?
 

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Can anyone explain further into different switches and thier installation. Maybe some info on momentary, SPDT, DPDT, and the like?
With switches, that refers to Single Pull Double Throw or Double Pull Double Throw. It is all about the internals of how the switch works, and how the contacts are set up on the back.
From Wiki (I took out a lot of garbage):
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In the simplest case, a switch has two conductive pieces, often metal, called contacts that touch to complete (make) a circuit, and separate to open (break) the circuit.
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A pair of contacts is said to be "closed" when current can flow from one to the other. When the contacts are separated by an insulating air gap, they are said to be "open", and no current can flow between them at normal voltages.
Switches are classified according to the arrangement of their contacts in electronics. Electricians installing building wiring use different nomenclature, such as "one-way", "two-way", "three-way" and "four-way" switches, which have different meanings in North American and British cultural regions as described in the table below.
In a push-button type switch, in which the contacts remain in one state unless actuated, the contacts can either be normally open (abbreviated "n.o." or "no") until closed by operation of the switch, or normally closed ("n.c. or "nc") and opened by the switch action. A switch with both types of contact is called a changeover switch. These may be "make-before-break" which momentarily connect both circuits, or may be "break-before-make" which interrupts one circuit before closing the other.
The terms pole and throw are also used to describe switch contact variations. The number of "poles" is the number of separate circuits which are controlled by a switch. For example, a "2-pole" switch has two separate identical sets of contacts controlled by the same knob. The number of "throws" is the number of separate positions that the switch can adopt. A single-throw switch has one pair of contacts that can either be closed or open. A double-throw switch has a contact that can be connected to either of two other contacts, a triple-throw has a contact which can be connected to one of three other contacts, etc.[4]
These terms give rise to abbreviations for the types of switch which are used in the electronics industry such as "single-pole, single-throw" (SPST) (the simplest type, "on or off") or "single-pole, double-throw" (SPDT), connecting either of two terminals to the common terminal. In electrical power wiring (i.e. House and building wiring by electricians) names generally involving the suffixed word "-way" are used; however, these terms differ between British and American English and the terms two way and three way are used in both with different meanings.

SPST Single pole, single throw
An example is a light switch.

SPDT Single pole, double throw
A simple changeover switch: C (COM, Common) is connected to L1 or to L2.
SPCO

DPST Double pole, single throw
Equivalent to two SPST switches controlled by a single mechanism

DPDT Double pole, double throw
Equivalent to two SPDT switches controlled by a single mechanism: A is connected to B and D to E, or A is connected to C and D to F.
 

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Great sticky!

I'm a complete retard when it comes to electrical wiring. I have a multimeter but I don't even know how to use it properly.

Question 1 - For signal light wires, how do you identify the purpose of each wire (without diagrams)?

Example - The front turning signal light is composed of 3 wires. I'm guessing 1 is the ground, 1 is the power for the signal light (to make it flash) and the remaining is the power for running lights (stays lit when you turn your lights on).

Question 2 - Based on the above signal light (and the wires being identified), if I wanted to hook it up to a new light (like the picture below) and it only had 2 wires (I'm guessing 1 positive & 1 ground) does this mean that I the new light can only have the function of either (a) signal (flashing) or (b) as a running light, but not both?
 

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Great sticky!

I'm a complete retard when it comes to electrical wiring. I have a multimeter but I don't even know how to use it properly.

Question 1 - For signal light wires, how do you identify the purpose of each wire (without diagrams)?

Example - The front turning signal light is composed of 3 wires. I'm guessing 1 is the ground, 1 is the power for the signal light (to make it flash) and the remaining is the power for running lights (stays lit when you turn your lights on).

Question 2 - Based on the above signal light (and the wires being identified), if I wanted to hook it up to a new light (like the picture below) and it only had 2 wires (I'm guessing 1 positive & 1 ground) does this mean that I the new light can only have the function of either (a) signal (flashing) or (b) as a running light, but not both?
This is a pretty good write up that details a lot of the wiring issues you may run into if you're working on the blinkers/marker lights.

http://www.jkowners.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7280&highlight=Blinker+Mod
 
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