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Every vehicle owner knows that a check engine light is NOT the worst thing that can happen. Weather can turn on a dime. Equipment and tools can break. Parts that should fit don't fit. The struggle is real. All we can do is roll with the punches. Well, that, and maybe laugh a bit at our misfortune.

What is your most memorable Jeep-related fail?

~MR 馃槉
 

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Was on a group ride. Autumn in the valley, winter in the hills.
Had bent my oil pan/filter skid previously, took it off to repair. Wheeled a bunch, never bothered with the actual repair.
Bombing along a snow covered FSR ahead of the pack.
A pool cue looking stick bounced up, threaded the needle through where my oil skid usually was and hit the auto shift lever, and snapped the tcase shifter and position sensor.
Crawled under, tapped the tcase back into 4 high, drove down the hills. The dash thought it was Christmas.
Got home and eventually figured out that as long as I could remember which position the t'case was in I could still drive it. At least until I could get someone to rewire that harness and sensor. Just not on the fly.
About 5 months later the auto trans shift lever snapped at the trans. Related? Hmmmm....no driving that one home.
 

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Every vehicle owner knows that a check engine light is NOT the worst thing that can happen. Weather can turn on a dime. Equipment and tools can break. Parts that should fit don't fit. The struggle is real. All we can do is roll with the punches. Well, that, and maybe laugh a bit at our misfortune.

What is your most memorable Jeep-related fail?

~MR 馃槉
Summer 2001 I attempted my first run over Black Bear Pass and down into Telluride (Colorado) in my former '94 YJ. I'd had Dynatrac 44/60 axles installed by a local shop the previous Fall. On the first switchback past Ingram Falls the left front brake line snapped off at the caliper. Apparently the shop never flexed it out or checked for clearance at full steering lock. No tools, no parts onboard, just my camera and camping gear. Fortunately it had a manual trans. I was able to crawl down to each successive switchback in 4LO, shut it off, then do the multi-point turns moving it back & forth with the starter. I kept my cool throughout all the way down into Telluride but the experience scared the living crap out of me. Lesson learned 1) always carry spares & tools, 2) always travel with a group that knows what they're doing. I joined the local 4x4 club shortly thereafter.
 

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^ Reminds me of the time in 2010 when I took my 1990-1/2 XJ up a mountain in winter.
This is all part of what got me into 4x4ing, so it worked out in the end.
It was a total POS, put a 3" pro-comp on it, wheeling at night with my nephew, the rear hard lines split. No brakes, no fluid, no 4 low, no phones, just 1st gear in 4x4. And some ditches, and also some snow to slow us down. We made it. Fixed it, wheeled again to find a leaking fuel rail and 2 broken injectors.
Ever try to buy a part in a hokey ass town where the "mechanic" is arguing that fuel injection didn't come out until 1991?
 

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First broken axle in the D30 in my TJ. On a mild trail at Rausch Creek and it started having trouble climbing an obstacle. When I finally got over it and off the trail to a kind of level spot I found the axle had broken and taken out both ball joints. The wheel / knuckle / hub assembly was only attached to the Jeep on by the rubber brake line.

Lucky for me Rausch not only had a pair of ball joints, but a press I could borrow. Put it all back together, but I had to cut the brake line so I could work on the knuckle. Folded over the brake line and clamped it with vise grips. Made for a long, slow ride back home, but I made it.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tire Tread Rim
 

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While I've seen a high lift jack used as a track bar or tie rod, I've not yet had such a problem. I did bend my tie rod by following a bad spotter. Lesson learned: never follow a spotter holding a beer in their other hand!! Group I was wheeling with had a tape measure, we adjusted the track to account for the bend and I drove it home. Gave me the excuse to replace it with a fusion tie rod. Fails are just new opportunities to upgrade! no whining now...
 
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