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Before we get started, here's the disclaimer. I am in no way an experienced veteran on this. This, in fact, was my first drive shaft replacement. I had some help with torque values and techniques along the way and thought I would share them.

Also, excuse the mud caked up on the Jeep. We’re on a water ban in GA and I didn’t want to drive it to the car wash in front wheel drive.

Step 1. (Optional) Dent your stock drive shaft on a rock.



Step 2. Place rear axle on jack stands and remove wheels.

Step 3. Remove (8) retaining bolts connecting the drive shaft to the rear axle output flange.

Step 4. Remove (8) retaining bolts connecting the drive shaft to the transfer case output flange.

Step 5. Separate the drive shaft from the transfer case flange using a flat tip screw driver or pry bar. This is the easy end. You can rest the drive shaft on the transfer case skid.

Step 6. Separate the drive shaft from the axle flange. Look on the back of the flange. There are some holes that aren't threaded. Use a round dull punch or screwdriver and a hammer through the holes to tap the drive shaft out. Work your way around as you go so it will come out even.

Sorry I don't have pictures for the steps above. This was done in the field.

Step 7. Check your front porch to see if your new drive shaft has arrived from Northridge 4X4.





Step 8. Next you must determine your rotational torque or pre-load on the pinion bearing before you remove the pinion nut.
Put in neutral, spread brake pads so they don't drag on disc, using a inch pound torque wrench(needle indicator type) that can measure as low as 2 1/2 inch pounds of torque (kd tools p/n 2955) and a 1 1/4" or 35 mm socket on the nut, rotate the pinion flange and record how much torque it takes to move it (mine took 20 inch lbs to turn the flange). Do this several times so you can get an average.
 

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Step 9. Remove the flange nut and washer from the rear axle pinion using a 35 mm socket.



Step 10. Using a gear puller, remove the flange from the rear axle pinion.




Step 11. Remove the dust ring from the factory flange and tap it in place on the replacement flange. I used the factory flange with a hammer to tap the dust ring in place.





Step 12. Install the new flange on the axle pinion using factory nut and washer.

Step 13. Using a flange holding tool ( a 24" piece of angle iron bolted to the flange) tighten pinion nut to about 150 ft/lbs (stop) take a rotation torque reading. Continue tightening pinion nut in 5 to 10 ft/lb increments, checking rotation torque each time until you reach your original rotational torque. I would not go past 210 ft./lbs in fear of
destroying the crush sleeve.

 

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Step 14. Remove the flange nut from the transfer case flange.




Step 15. Remove flange from transfer case using a gear puller.




Step 16. Install new flange on transfer case and toque to 85 – 95 ft/lbs.



Step 17. Connect your new drive shaft to the transfer case flange using the supplied (not in my case) 12mmx1.75x30 bolts. There is no torque value for these, but you want them as tight as you can get them without stressing the bolt. I used blue lock tight on these bolts.



Step 18. Connect your new drive shaft to the axle flange using the supplied hardware. There is no torque value for these, but you want them as tight as you can get them without stressing the bolt. I used blue lock tight on these bolts.



Test drive and check for vibrations and leaks. Adjust control arms if needed for vibration.

 

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Nice write-up, beautiful pictures. I have a question regarding step 13.

Step 13. Using a flange holding tool ( a 24" piece of angle iron bolted to the flange) tighten pinion nut to about 150 ft/lbs (stop) take a rotation torque reading. Continue tightening pinion nut in 5 to 10 ft/lb increments, checking rotation torque each time until you reach your original rotational torque. I would not go past 210 ft./lbs in fear of
destroying the crush sleeve.

Question: Starting at 150 ft/lbs, you add to the 150 ft/lbs, 5 - 10 ft/lbs of additional torque incrementally and each time measure rotational torque until you reach your original measurement (20 lbs in your case)? I think I understand, just need a confirmation

Also: Where did you find the torque requirements?

Again - great job!!!!! Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice write-up, beautiful pictures. I have a question regarding step 13.

Step 13. Using a flange holding tool ( a 24" piece of angle iron bolted to the flange) tighten pinion nut to about 150 ft/lbs (stop) take a rotation torque reading. Continue tightening pinion nut in 5 to 10 ft/lb increments, checking rotation torque each time until you reach your original rotational torque. I would not go past 210 ft./lbs in fear of
destroying the crush sleeve.

Question: Starting at 150 ft/lbs, you add to the 150 ft/lbs, 5 - 10 ft/lbs of additional torque incrementally and each time measure rotational torque until you reach your original measurement (20 lbs in your case)? I think I understand, just need a confirmation

Also: Where did you find the torque requirements?

Again - great job!!!!! Thanks


Yup, you got it.

I got the torque values from some members on another forum.
 

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I would not go past 210 ft./lbs in fear of destroying the crush sleeve.
If you get to 200 ft/lbs (D44) before you reach the torque to rotate, then you most probably need a new crush sleeve anyway. You should use a new pinion nut regardless.

It's worth noting that the different axles have different starting lbs/ft and different max lbs/ft for the pinion nut.

Very nice write up and install :)
 

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I just installed the front and rear 1310 heavy duty driveshafts and have a few things I would like to add. First, if anyone from JE Reel reads this, I'm kinda annoyed with you for not including instructions with a drive shafts. Your website is terrible and if sites like this forum here didn't exist, I wouldn't have been able to install them myself. Second, check to make sure the sockets you plan on using to install the pinion nuts fit inside the new pinions. I was fortunate that I went and installed these in an autoshop on base and they were able to grind down the socket so I could torque the nuts down. And the last thing is that I had to use a 2 ton press to remove and install the dust covers for the front and rear pinions on the transfer case. Just wanted to give you guys a heads up on a few of the issues I had so you can avoid them yourselves.
 

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Well that was a ridiculously long four hour+ job. And this isn't my first rodeo.
I searched for an hour and found this awsome thread about the Reel driveshafts. I have to agree with Hood. No instructions, website under construction. R U Kidding!
Anyway to the OP- Thank you for your time with the writeup and pics.
2010 JK unlimited. Ordered both front and rear. No numbers on anything had to measure to figure out which one is front/rear. PS the bigger/longer one goes in the rear.
needed a 33mm 6 point 1/2 drive regular socket for the rear pinion. Pinion preload was 14 inch/pounds. Impact socket is too thick for the new yoke.
1-1/4 on the tcase end. resetting pinion was easy with the right tools.

Needed a 30mm 6pt regular socket for the front pinion. 40 inch/pounds preload. had to remove dust shield to set preload. What a bear. 1 1/4 again on the T case.
Dust shields did not fit on the new yokes, too big and the oil seal held it out so far the metal contacted the back of the yoke. left them off.
The rubber O-ring under the nut on the transfer case flange does NOT get reused.
I am so tired of spending money on these projects and not recieving parts and torque specs or instructions. Too bad initially it appears to be a well made product. Reel Driveline will not be getting my repeat business I'm sorry to say.
 

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Yeah, been there:)

El-new'o <----------------> El-broken'o



Love the JEReel shafts :beer: HOODJK is right, no instructions and crapy website. Great product so its all good.
 

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If it's coming from the breather I'd suspect one of two things, a/ over heating, b/ over full (hard to do).

Either way, I'd drain the fluid, check the fluid condition, and fill it back up.
 

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where is the fluid dripping? the breather tube goes up to the firewall behind the engine, it connects to the top of the case right above the front driveshaft at the tcase.
 

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After getting my car hauler back from my Dad, fixing the taillight that got crushed because he let someone else borrow it and replacing the connector that was drug down the street. (Sorry it adds to my day:shaking:)
The T-case fluid was comming from the rear tcase seal. Upon disassembly I found the lip of the seal to have torn all the way around. I wonder if it tore because I didn't lubricate it on installation. Rubber on dry metal??
I did speak to JE Reel today.
I was told to silicon the splines on installation, and the o-ring is not reused. He was surprised that the dust shields didn't fit on the new yokes.
Did anyone else have to silicon seal the splines?

Replaced new output flange seal. Started leaking again. Ill have to pull it apart tomarrow.
 

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yeah i used alittle silicon on the splines... my front diff was leaking alittle when i first replaced my shafts, but it stopped. i replaced my seals at the same time.
 

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How do companies like JE Reel stay alive in the almost total lack of customer service?
This is the ONLY write-up I was able to find on installing a driveline, and I'm just saying THANK YOU!
Other forums don't speak about pre-load values. The Teraflex video on Youtube doesn't speak about it either. Glad I saw it on here!
Need to go out and get a inch-pound torque wrench now with a dial or needle value.
Thanks again! :th_pray:
 

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Not sure what your experience was but I called them several times when I installed my DS and was on the phone for almost an hour just talking Jeep stuff. I had a great experience. With regards to the torque wrench you can make the dial type work. The biggest problem I had was trying to retighten the pinion nut to torque specs, it took me a little bit to figure out how to tighten without the collar spinning. I had put some loctite on it and it hardens pretty quick, so make sure you have that figured out prior to applying any loctite.

Good luck.
 

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Not sure what your experience was but I called them several times when I installed my DS and was on the phone for almost an hour just talking Jeep stuff. I had a great experience. With regards to the torque wrench you can make the dial type work. The biggest problem I had was trying to retighten the pinion nut to torque specs, it took me a little bit to figure out how to tighten without the collar spinning. I had put some loctite on it and it hardens pretty quick, so make sure you have that figured out prior to applying any loctite.

Good luck.
Thanks, every little bit of help - helps! :D
 

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Just installed mind and there's a slight vibration when under a load. I also noticed that when you look at the rear of the slip yoke you can see the very end of the splines. Could this shaft be too short?
 
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