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Have you ever mounted your Hi-lift in a particular location on your Jeep, and then moved it because you didn’t like the original spot?

If so, what didn’t you like about the first spot, and did your second choice work better?

I’ve got the TeraFlex hinged tire carrier, and I’m about 85% sure I’m going to get the jack mount that they have but it’s not cheap and I’m curious if anybody had specific reasons that there may be better options, not the mount specifically but the rear bumper location in general.

Seems like a no brainer but never hurts to ask, right?
 

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Best place for a Hi Lift jack is in the dumpster. Very unstable and dangerous. Once ya seen enough bones get broken ya tend to shy away from the contraptions. And the more suspension flex you have, the more worthless they become.

Go to Tractor Supply and get a good hydraulic bottle jack. Carry a coupla short scrap 2x4's for a nice base for the jack so it can be placed right under the axle.

Store the jack and the wood under one of the seats.

Also seen folks totin' 'round small floor jacks but they're more cumbersome in my opinion.

Or reckon a fella can be one of the cool kids and strap a Hi Lift right across their hood next to their snorkel.

And don't forget to wave when ya pass one of 'em.
 

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I have the Tera rear hinge mount carrier and a River Raider inside rear mount. They both have their pros and cons, but I may prefer the RR just a bit over Tera just because the elements really beat on the jack when its exposed.

Tera pros: a little easier to attach the mount and jack; rattles outside instead of inside; compatible with any height jack; can attach Rotopax to the jack; doesn't obstruct cargo area

RR / inside rear pros: less expensive; less vulnerable to theft; won't get caught on branches on trail; less exposed to the elements; can use wingnuts to secure; doesn't interfere with rear glass opening; won't interfere with rear CB antenna; the jack and other tools (gloves, jack base, chains etc.) are right in the same spot; doesn't interfere with removable tops.
 

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If you can't install it inside your jeep install it in the garage.
 
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Have you ever mounted your Hi-lift in a particular location on your Jeep, and then moved it because you didn’t like the original spot?

If so, what didn’t you like about the first spot, and did your second choice work better?

I’ve got the TeraFlex hinged tire carrier, and I’m about 85% sure I’m going to get the jack mount that they have but it’s not cheap and I’m curious if anybody had specific reasons that there may be better options, not the mount specifically but the rear bumper location in general.

Seems like a no brainer but never hurts to ask, right?
After a few years in my original spot, I moved my Hi-Lift . . . up 2" :laughing:

I originally made the base a quick-disconnect deal (tractor hitch pin) and welded up a lockable vertical receiver on the left rear corner of my Jeep.





That worked well for holding the jack, but it maximized the dragassability of the left rear corner, so . . .


I cut a couple inches off the bottom while shaving the outer corners of the rear bumper:




Between that ^^^ re-fookery, and some new shoes:



. . . I don't expect to scrape the jack mount soon or often



Also, when I redid my jack mount, I added a set screw to take all slop out of the pocket (sorry, no good pics of that).

My Hi-Lift makes zero noise :D




Best place for a Hi Lift jack is in the dumpster.
Oh, fawk no!

Very unstable and dangerous. Once ya seen enough bones get broken ya tend to shy away from the contraptions.
. . . are you describing farm jacks, or fast wimmens? :dunno:

And the more suspension flex you have, the more worthless they become.
. . . unless you know how to operate a ratchet strap to hold the axle up to the frame

Go to Tractor Supply and get a good hydraulic bottle jack. Carry a coupla short scrap 2x4's for a nice base for the jack so it can be placed right under the axle.

Store the jack and the wood under one of the seats.
. . . tied in somehow, unless you want your skull caved in in a minor crash or rollover

Also seen folks totin' 'round small floor jacks but they're more cumbersome in my opinion.

Or reckon a fella can be one of the cool kids and strap a Hi Lift right across their hood next to their snorkel.

And don't forget to wave when ya pass one of 'em.
Yes Sir, a farm jack can be a dangerous tool indeed, and scary as fawk if not treated with respect.
It can require caution and (gasp) perhaps even sobriety to use without mortally endangering yourself.
Not all people should be entrusted with (nor accept) such responsibility.

However, to vilify a machine because you cannot trust yourself to operate it is unfair. I don't look forward to using a farm jack, but nothing can replace it as a jack, spreader, clamp, and winch all in one simple package. It's a serious responsibility that I am willing to accept in the interest of the mechanical abilities to be gained.

By the way, other systems that can kill you if used improperly include: motor vehicles, firearms, Coors beer, and vaginas.

Along with the scary farm jack, you might want to avoid those "just to be safe" :thefinger:
 

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I've never once injured myself with a Hi Lift jack.

And I stand behind my opinion of 'em. Silly to use somethin' so dangerous, inefficient, and bulky.

To each his own.

I'll stick with ***** and beer ... and my bottle jack.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The jack was a gift from my wife and daughter.

It will be mounted on my Jeep.
(Probably only while on the trail)

Dangerous if not paying attention?
Hell yes.

Handy AF when you need it?
Hell yes.
 

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I have a hilift, but I just mounted it with two muffler clamps on the roll bar. A couple of threaded knobs and it doesn’t rattle, and can be removed in two minutes. A bottle jack definitely has its place, but I have been in places where a hi lift was the only way I could get my Jeep in the air.
 

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I would have to say I am in the Kowboy camp on this one. Dragged a hi lift around for years. When I finally needed it, it was so F'd up from the elements I could not get it to work. Sure, an hour of cleaning and oiling returned it to working order, but I soon parted ways with it. (sold it, not a dumpster)


A friend of mine made himself a cool bottle jack "assembly". People liked them so much he makes them for friends now. I carry one and will never go back to the hi lift. I think this does what I want it to do - jack up my axle. And with the extensions, it can handle pretty much anything. Stores in the ammo can. Safely strapped down in the back.
I like this!
 

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I would have to say I am in the Kowboy camp on this one. Dragged a hi lift around for years. When I finally needed it, it was so F'd up from the elements I could not get it to work. Sure, an hour of cleaning and oiling returned it to working order, but I soon parted ways with it. (sold it, not a dumpster)


A friend of mine made himself a cool bottle jack "assembly". People liked them so much he makes them for friends now. I carry one and will never go back to the hi lift. I think this does what I want it to do - jack up my axle. And with the extensions, it can handle pretty much anything. Stores in the ammo can. Safely strapped down in the back.
I like this!
 

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While I agree a hilift is almost always the wrong tool, there is that very rare time where it is pretty much the correct and possibly only tool to finish the job. Changing a tire it's always the wrong tool. Basically if you're trying to lift the axle, do not lift it by lifting the frame with a hilift.

In my several hundred trail days over the last 4 years, I've seen a hilift be the correct tool twice:

-Upper links broke off someone's axle on a triangulated 4-link. Springs fell out body sitting on the axle. Sure you probably could use a bottle jack but a hilift is going to do the job way faster, easier, and I'd honestly argue safer. If you want to lift the frame/body, it's pretty hard to beat a hilift. Just make sure things are supported in other ways before you get under the vehicle and start repairs.

-Got myself so incredibly stuck high-centered on a big boulder in the middle of Prichett Canyon trail solo that a hilift was the only tool that was getting me off that rock without wiping out a drive-line (a second Jeep driving by would probably have been helpful too, as would a rear-winch, neither of which did I have access to). A second time I got myself so stuck that I damaged a drive shaft and a wheel where if I hadn't been so lazy at the time I could have gotten out unscathed by using my hilift (it was pouring rain alone on a cold day high centered on some rocks and I decided to just send it on the winch and deal with it at home).


I'd say if you're using your hilift even 1% of days on the trail you're doing something very wrong. I still carry one though because it's a tool that does a few jobs very well, and does a whole bunch of jobs poorly to moderately well. It also makes a good land-anchor if it ever comes to that (I personally haven't had to use mine for that yet).


For tire changes away from home, I just use the OEM jack. Turns out your Jeep came with a tool specifically designed for exactly that task.
 

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A friend of mine made himself a cool bottle jack "assembly". People liked them so much he makes them for friends now. I carry one and will never go back to the hi lift. I think this does what I want it to do - jack up my axle. And with the extensions, it can handle pretty much anything. Stores in the ammo can. Safely strapped down in the back.
So is your friend willing to sell them? Been looking at these types of bottle jack accessories by the only other manufacturer that I've seen make them, but they are considerably high priced for what they are and have yet to pull the trigger. Getting close to though cause I'm not finding any alternatives, and don't know how to weld myself.

To the OP, I had my hi-lift mounted to my EVO hinge mounted tire carrier using their holder. Got caught on a branch and bent the shit out of the hi-lift holder. No damage to the tire carrier, and was able to use a hammer to bend the hi-lift holder back into position, but went ahead and pulled the trigger on the Dominion Offroad setup to mount it inside along with the accessory holders to attach a shovel and axe or whatever.

In my last Jeep I would just toss the hi-lift under my rear seats when offroading. Like others have already mentioned benefits to mounting it inside include keeping it out of the elements and preventing from getting hung up on anything if mounted on the tailgate.

Will eventually add a bottle jack setup as my primary, but won't stop keeping a hi-lift inside the Jeep for those one off times where a bottle jack won't work when offroading.
 

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I've got the first responder version of the hi-lift jack. Primarily got it for SHTF use. Sitting in the garage as I need to break it down so it can get new powder coat. The outdoor elements really took a beating on it when it was mounted on my front bumper.


I am looking for some bottle jack options and came across these two:

Screen Shot 2018-12-30 at 2.19.37 AM.png

Screen Shot 2018-12-30 at 2.20.41 AM.png


I got some Amazon gift cards that need to be used so might pick one of these up if I can't find a domestic made similar unit...
 

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The jack was a gift from my wife and daughter. It will be mounted on my Jeep.
Sure glad they didn't buy ya a huge purple dildo then ... that would look even worser mounted on your jeep.


The first rule of hi-lift club is always mount your hi-lift where everyone can see that you own a hi-lift
And the snorkel ... don't forget the fuckin' snorkel.


A friend of mine made himself a cool bottle jack "assembly". People liked them so much he makes them for friends now.
I ain't got no friends ... but that set-up's fuckin' sweet and a helluva lot nicer than my redneck version. I'd gladly buy one if'n he wants to sell one.
 

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I would have to say I am in the Kowboy camp on this one. Dragged a hi lift around for years. When I finally needed it, it was so F'd up from the elements I could not get it to work. Sure, an hour of cleaning and oiling returned it to working order, but I soon parted ways with it. (sold it, not a dumpster)


A friend of mine made himself a cool bottle jack "assembly". People liked them so much he makes them for friends now. I carry one and will never go back to the hi lift. I think this does what I want it to do - jack up my axle. And with the extensions, it can handle pretty much anything. Stores in the ammo can. Safely strapped down in the back.
I really dig that idea/design.

Would he be willing to make the base and the axle adapter, then ship it? I can get the jack and can locally.
 

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These jack/stands work very well. They take up some room but are very safe and reliable. I have 2 now.

I would always mount a Hi-lift inside your vehicle or lube it once a month and check its operation. I've lightened my vehicle quite a bit so I no longer carry all this extra stuff unless I know I am going somewhere I will need it.

I've got the first responder version of the hi-lift jack. Primarily got it for SHTF use. Sitting in the garage as I need to break it down so it can get new powder coat. The outdoor elements really took a beating on it when it was mounted on my front bumper.


I am looking for some bottle jack options and came across these two:

View attachment 334816

View attachment 334818


I got some Amazon gift cards that need to be used so might pick one of these up if I can't find a domestic made similar unit...
 

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Since you have a 4 door, hi lift jacks will slide right under the back seat, out of the elements and helps to keep the weight more centered in the jeep. I only take mine when the wife and I go on solo trips, when we go with a group, I let those suckers carry the added weight since mine is such a pig. I do always carry a small aluminium jack at all times though.
 
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