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Discussion Starter #1
For all the guys that have HEMI swaps and have been battling overheating or overall lack of proper fan speed controls, we have the solution for you.

EZPWM FAN CONTROLER

This module ties directly into the ECU data can bus wires and will monitor engine coolant temp, AC pressures and engine RPM. It will then use those to control a PWM Pentastar fan base on engine temp and AC pressure. This unit is programed to more closely match the needed fan speed of a V8 compared to a factory setting. This unit controls the fan directly and does not require the TIPM for fan control.

Its a simple 5 wire hookup and the module itself is about the size of a standard relay.

OPERATION:
When the unit is powered up the PWM fan will run at a low Idle speed. This help keep air moving and makes the fan respond faster.
The module will monitor the engine temp and will command the fan to the desired %.
205 degrees = 30%
215 degrees = 50%
220 degrees = 75%
230+ degrees = 100%

This unit will also monitor the AC pressure and will command higher fan speed based on AC system needs.

You can also add on up to 2 additional inputs that can be positive or negative controlled. These can be set to command the fan speed for override switches or other applications.

 

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Premium Member
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513 Posts
For all the guys that have HEMI swaps and have been battling overheating or overall lack of proper fan speed controls, we have the solution for you.



EZPWM FAN CONTROLER



This module ties directly into the ECU data can bus wires and will monitor engine coolant temp, AC pressures and engine RPM. It will then use those to control a PWM Pentastar fan base on engine temp and AC pressure. This unit is programed to more closely match the needed fan speed of a V8 compared to a factory setting. This unit controls the fan directly and does not require the TIPM for fan control.



Its a simple 5 wire hookup and the module itself is about the size of a standard relay.



OPERATION:

When the unit is powered up the PWM fan will run at a low Idle speed. This help keep air moving and makes the fan respond faster.

The module will monitor the engine temp and will command the fan to the desired %.

205 degrees = 30%

215 degrees = 50%

220 degrees = 75%

230+ degrees = 100%



This unit will also monitor the AC pressure and will command higher fan speed based on AC system needs.



You can also add on up to 2 additional inputs that can be positive or negative controlled. These can be set to command the fan speed for override switches or other applications.



Are the ECT setpoints adjustable? I just installed a 180 degree thermostat and would like to run the fan speeds about 23 degrees lower and possibly tweak them if needed (Hemi with Pentastar fan). I'm using HP Tuners so changes to the PCM shouldn't be a problem (like simply turning off the pcm fan control); but my fan is currently only on 100% or off.

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
 
Joined
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725 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Are the ECT setpoints adjustable? I just installed a 180 degree thermostat and would like to run the fan speeds about 23 degrees lower and possibly tweak them if needed (Hemi with Pentastar fan). I'm using HP Tuners so changes to the PCM shouldn't be a problem (like simply turning off the pcm fan control); but my fan is currently only on 100% or off.

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
The settings are not user adjustable. we can set them before we send out the module if you need something custom.

The settings in the PCM will have no affect on our fan settings.
 

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Do you have any recommendations or examples of the preferred setup for the auxiliary wiring? Figured I'd ask here in case anyone else is wondering...

I'd like to be able to override the control to put the fan in high speed, and also to shut it down. I'm thinking a single three-way toggle switch would accomplish what I'm looking for; just don't know the optimal wiring configuration to order with the controller. Thanks again!

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
 
Joined
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725 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Do you have any recommendations or examples of the preferred setup for the auxiliary wiring? Figured I'd ask here in case anyone else is wondering...

I'd like to be able to override the control to put the fan in high speed, and also to shut it down. I'm thinking a single three-way toggle switch would accomplish what I'm looking for; just don't know the optimal wiring configuration to order with the controller. Thanks again!

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
The module can support 2 inputs. They can be either a positive or negative input, meaning you can supply 12 volts or a ground signal to activate them. We would have to know up front what you plan on using for inputs so we can program the module.

You could use a 3 way toggle switch. Center position would be (module control fan) Up would be option A and down would be option B for example.
Option A and B could be pre programed for whatever speed you request. Lets say A= 50% and B= 100%.
The module will always run the fan at the higher requested speed. let say you had option A turned on and set for 25% but the engine temp was calling for 50%... it would run at 50% until the temps dropped down below the 50% set point.

Im not sure if I could incorporate a way to turn the fan off completely. You could put a toggle switch that would turn off the power to the module and it would shut down but in my experience guys usually forget to turn it back on until they see the engine overheating. I could probably add some code to the module that would look for a input and shut the fan down as long as the engine temp is below a certain set point. once the set point is exceeded it would override the command and turn the fan back on. I would have to engineer this and test the code... there would be a added cost for sure. I would also add in the code so you would have to have the AC turned off if you want to do a fan shutdown override.
 

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I'd only use a shutdown switch for water-fording, but good point about forgetting to turn it back on and the ac system issue. I'll probably run a cutoff switch separately if at all.

Sounds like having 100% and 50% would be best for the two options. Looking at the likely temperature settings, I think the fan would run at 25-50% on road most of the time and would rarely shut off.

What's the more popular way to do input - 12V or ground? I'm thinking ground would mean one less hot wire to run. Any other reasons to go one way or another?

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
 
Joined
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725 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I'd only use a shutdown switch for water-fording, but good point about forgetting to turn it back on and the ac system issue. I'll probably run a cutoff switch separately if at all.

Sounds like having 100% and 50% would be best for the two options. Looking at the likely temperature settings, I think the fan would run at 25-50% on road most of the time and would rarely shut off.

What's the more popular way to do input - 12V or ground? I'm thinking ground would mean one less hot wire to run. Any other reasons to go one way or another?

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
We usually run the fan 30% at 205 degrees and bring it up to 50% at 215-220. then we run it at max above 230 or so. it also varies based on AC pressure.
Also when the engine is running the fan will be running at a low idle speed. This helps keep air moving and makes the fan respond faster to Ac pressure increases.

Running positive controlled switches takes a little less wiring on our part. If you run negative controlled switches we have to add a pullup resistor to get a clean on-off signal. Either way is no big deal.
 
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