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Just wondering what others carry on board in terms of first aid kit? I am considering replacing the little $20 kit with a bigger EMT style kit for first responders.


Just wondering what you all have for all day expeditions?
 

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I think there are a few threads on here somewhere but I am too lazy to search around.

I have been an EMT for 20 years and have carried various different packs - most often times too much.

I keep a pelican box (protects from the elements) stuffed full of just about everything that I need to get someone patched up. I have used it several times, once for a broken foot on the trail and several eye washes for dust etc...

Everything is kept in zip lock baggies with common items packed together (trauma/drugs/burn stuff etc...) I also write the exp date with a black sharpie so I can easily see when I need to replace something. I use the kit for offshore trips as well and will add in some stuff for neuro checks and jellyfish stings etc... I will keep oxygen and a bigger kit in the tow rig when it goes as well.

I keep the following in there at all times:

Paramedic pocket guide
trauma shears / forceps / scissors / tweezers / scalpel
Glucose checker and two tubes of insta-glucose
CPR Mask (it will accept a BVM)
3pr gloves
Waterproof adhesive tape
Ace/elastic bandage (twisted ankles etc....)
4 rolls of kerlix
12 4x4s (sterile)
8 5x9s (sterile)
Assorted sizes of band aids
Eye pads/patch
Eyewash
Sam splint <-- a must have for any kit IMO, they can be used in so many ways.
2 triangle bandage
BP cuff and stethoscope
Asprin/tylenol/benadryl/immodium
Antibiotic ointment, hydrocortizone cream
Ring cutter
splinter outs
note pad, pen and black sharpie (notepad and pen are waterproof)
burn jel (waterjel)
emergency blanket
bio hazard bag (can be used for more than a bio trash bag)
quick clot
Hydrogen peroxide
betadine ampules
Alcohol wipes
Sting relief wipes (for bug bites)
q-tips

I also keep some matches wrapped up in saran wrap in there just in case my treatment doesn't work and I have the need to dispose of the body... and it keeps the matches nice and dry at all times.


I will go snap a few pics...











So that is what I keep in that kit. I also have a c-collar handy and one of these cool little devices in case of a femur fracture:


http://www.narescue.com/Portal.aspx?CN=A07841C7DE34

I also have a "go bag" with rescue type stuff in it including a 4:1 in a bag and some extra pulleys, caribiners, gibbs ascenders and some rope. I can get a sked stretcher for bigger/longer trips if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
E-jeep Thanks for the link!
 

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I have one of those basic first aid kits from Wally-world, but sorta modded it to my surroundings. Carry more meds than what came with the kit, due to my digestive issues, some sports medicine type of stuff because my car is usually closer to the injury than our facilities. Need to get some gauze pads, tape, and pre-wrap though.

Keep in mind, this is in a HS videographer's Elantra, and more serious stuff is handled by EMS. Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it. Hence why most of the trunk of my car is filled with tools, survival gear, first aid stuff, and camera gear
 

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I carry a basic "5 day" kit from REI.

Other than applying a band-aid or giving some ibuprofen or asparin, I'm capable of calling 911 or driving the injured back to civilization, that's the limit of my skills...

JPK
 

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it falls in 2 groups based on a simple question: "Do you have a clue on emergency medicine?"

if the answer is yes: You know what you are capable of and know your gear to bring.

If the answer is no: band aids, triangular bandages and some H or truama bandages. thats it, follow the directions. Or just buy a small soft side "basic" kit and stuff it full of MORE band aids. I probably have a couple hundred band aids in my stuff and I am a trained professional :laughing: most of those basic kits are more than you will need.


Things I DON'T carry: Drugs, of any kind, for ANYONE but myself/buddies/family. If I don't know you then you are not getting shit. NOt even a Tylenol.

Instant ice packs, they explode over time and make a mess..every time.

cheap ass mylar "space" blankets, get the reflective "tarp" kind. those cheap ass folds to the size of a deck of cards crap suck.

Things I do carry: triangular bandages..lots of them. quality band aids, a fawking ambu bag because I HATE doing mouth to mouth...fawk that..I have been puked on enough. And then lots and lots of other stuff I will NOT recomend to non-trained people. :thefinger: sorry but I do not want someone throwing quick clot or a tourniquet on me who has no clue what they are doing.


TRAINING is more important than gear. TRAIN and then you know the gear. I am fine with a sharp knife and the clothing you are wearing for 90% of emergency medicine. Yes, a well stocked bag is nice but you don't "need" it.
 

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Good points doc.

And x2 on the cold packs.... makes one hell of a mess. There is usually plenty of Ice chests around on the trail so I just use ice from there if needed.

Do you have any experience with the clot gauze? Less mess/burn and supposedly pretty effective from what I have seen (no actual experience).
 

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I like the "carry what you know how to use" philosophy. My kit includes a couple of suture kits and medical stapler, but I know how to use them. In most situations on the trail, a bandage and duct tape are more appropriate than suturing for a laceration. The portable splint is great and more comfortable than a couple of sticks for fracture stabalization. The rule on the trail is to stabilize in the position you find it unless you know how to reduce and set a fracture.

As for the ambu bag. Good idea, light weight, definitely better than a mouthful of puke (you think your own tastes bad.....). However, if someone arrests on the trail, meaning they loose consciousness, stop breathing, and have no pulse, and you are trained in resuscitation begin CPR and hope a portable defibrillator is near. You have a maximum of 15 minutes to reestablish a heart rythm that has a pulse. Doesn't matter how good you are at CPR. You are not as good as the heart is to move blood and oxygen. After that time there is irreparable brain damage and any chance of meaningful recovery has flown out the window. If that happens, do not get down on yourseldf that you should have done more. Unlike the TV series ER, real statistics show about a 1 to 5% chance of leaving the hospital following an arrest and most of those occure in the hospital with a defibrillator minutes away. Done with the soapbox.

One thing that I think is often overlooked is a communication and signalling device. I don't always have this if I am going someplace where a cell phone will do but, out West, especially on a multiday trip, a cell phone is often out of range. I will be renting a Sat Phone this year for our extended trip and I carry a simple signal flare kit to make smoke in case I have to add a visual for our site. The kits sold for recreational boaters is easy to pack and use.

The last thing. Store an extra box of common sense somewhere to tap into when your own is all used up.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
JK doc, appreciate your input as well as all the others. And while I do work in a medical center I am not a doc, an administrator(MBA style) I worry about being out on a Jamboree or something without access to local EMS. Last year on the Snow Shoe jamboree we had a big ZERO for coms on any phone so I may be going after a HAM or sat phone too, I actually think EMT training is in my future, but not until after my June adventure.

So with all of the input I will be going with a kit I can use and a big box of common sense.
 

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Good points doc.

And x2 on the cold packs.... makes one hell of a mess. There is usually plenty of Ice chests around on the trail so I just use ice from there if needed.

Do you have any experience with the clot gauze? Less mess/burn and supposedly pretty effective from what I have seen (no actual experience).
clot gauze, Quick clot, hemacon, whatever is designed for one use and one use only:
uncontrollable bleeding that is an area that a tourniquet can not be used on.(chest/groin/ect)



Thats it. :D
not replacement for a pressure bandage, not replacement for a t-shirt duct taped in place. I fawking HATE the fact they sell that stuff at outdoor shops :laughing:
Effectiveness is based on training with THAT particular product. But the gauze is MUCH easier to stuff in a hole than powder.

But most people have no idea what "uncontrollable bleeding" is. Think SPRAYING blood, like a puddle the size of a hulahoop. Think more blood than you have EVER seen.


Soap box :laughing: : People, pick up books on TACTICAL MEDICINE, shit like the SOC medical book or survival medicine. EMT/EMS and even Paramedic is based on the simple fact you are going to a hospital eventually :laughing: Its great but not when you have no idea how far away one is. EMS works on the pricipal on a near unlimited supply of everything.
push fluids, we have more.
push whole blood, we have more.
use more guaze, don't RE USE gauze.
It also works on that people like to sue :laughing: don't use a tourniquet because people may lose the limb or get nerve damage. Don't re-locate that brake or dislocation because it hurts.
Fuck that. LIFE OVER LIMB. Tourniquets can be on for HOURS before causing issues.

even Airway Breathing Circulation crap. "are they breathing?" who cares, are they bleeding OUT? :laughing:

Learn tactical or survival medicine along side the traditional EMS, it will save you or someone else.
 

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I carry the rotopax survival and first aid kit w/ 2 gal water tank
 

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Excellent First Aid Kit List

Mr. RonGilbert, This is probably the best, most complete and yet efficient First Aid Kit for jeep adventures and for any outback adventures. We include OTC med/perscritions meds in a separate small box so that it is easier to update or swap out depending who is on the outing. We run into too many people that have everything to mechanically get their rigs out after an incident, but most lack the equipment to take care of the people. Thank you for sharing, I/we will be using this to augment our list.


I think there are a few threads on here somewhere but I am too lazy to search around.

I have been an EMT for 20 years and have carried various different packs - most often times too much.

I keep a pelican box (protects from the elements) stuffed full of just about everything that I need to get someone patched up. I have used it several times, once for a broken foot on the trail and several eye washes for dust etc...

Everything is kept in zip lock baggies with common items packed together (trauma/drugs/burn stuff etc...) I also write the exp date with a black sharpie so I can easily see when I need to replace something. I use the kit for offshore trips as well and will add in some stuff for neuro checks and jellyfish stings etc... I will keep oxygen and a bigger kit in the tow rig when it goes as well.

I keep the following in there at all times:

Paramedic pocket guide
trauma shears / forceps / scissors / tweezers / scalpel
Glucose checker and two tubes of insta-glucose
CPR Mask (it will accept a BVM)
3pr gloves
Waterproof adhesive tape
Ace/elastic bandage (twisted ankles etc....)
4 rolls of kerlix
12 4x4s (sterile)
8 5x9s (sterile)
Assorted sizes of band aids
Eye pads/patch
Eyewash
Sam splint <-- a must have for any kit IMO, they can be used in so many ways.
2 triangle bandage
BP cuff and stethoscope
Asprin/tylenol/benadryl/immodium
Antibiotic ointment, hydrocortizone cream
Ring cutter
splinter outs
note pad, pen and black sharpie (notepad and pen are waterproof)
burn jel (waterjel)
emergency blanket
bio hazard bag (can be used for more than a bio trash bag)
quick clot
Hydrogen peroxide
betadine ampules
Alcohol wipes
Sting relief wipes (for bug bites)
q-tips

I also keep some matches wrapped up in saran wrap in there just in case my treatment doesn't work and I have the need to dispose of the body... and it keeps the matches nice and dry at all times.


I will go snap a few pics...











So that is what I keep in that kit. I also have a c-collar handy and one of these cool little devices in case of a femur fracture:


http://www.narescue.com/Portal.aspx?CN=A07841C7DE34

I also have a "go bag" with rescue type stuff in it including a 4:1 in a bag and some extra pulleys, caribiners, gibbs ascenders and some rope. I can get a sked stretcher for bigger/longer trips if needed.
 
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