JKOwners Forum banner

21 - 40 of 56 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
518 Posts
Metalcloak also sells front upper long arm frame brackets. I'm running them because while their radius arm contraption looks interesting, I think the Tennessee mud would ruin them in no time. Here's the MC full 4-link long arm setup:





Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,144 Posts
Personally the only long arm kit out there that is worth a shit is the Genright and it is stupid expensive. You are not going to see much gain at all by doing a long arm kit that is offered today because there are too many limitations on the JK without hacking it up and moving the fuel tank on the rear and up front most kits are only a couple inches longer the the factory arms. IF you want a great set up for a daily driver and wheeling look at Metal Cloak or Synergy, they both have options in your lift height and use a good joint that gives superior ride quality vs the ball and socket type. If you don't like those then I would look into genright, EVO, Currie, Clayton, JKS. Learn what's in a lift kit and what you need for the height and tire size you are looking at.
I've been running a Teraflex Prerunner long arm for the last six years. Overall I'm pleased with it, but their upper flex joints are too small for the loads they have to manage and self destruct regularly. The lower flex joints are fine. It spits out a clevite joint occasionally. Teraflex threw out their flex joints and clevites, replaced with the Alpine all-clevite design. Getting very good reviews.

A long arm is marginally more stable on the trail than a short arm, and highway ride is improved. All that said, you can get virtually as much out of a front drop bracket added to a short arm as you do with a long arm. I would not do another long arm on a JK. JL remains to be seen. The two long arm kits I've seen use a much longer rear upper arm, made possible by the JLs wider track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
Those lowers should be good rock catchers. Good geometry up front is hard with the lack of space for the frame side mounts. You are better off off road with the short arm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
Thedirtman I plan on sticking with 35's for now since i still have the stock Dana 30 and the crappy 3.21 gears. I do hope to upgrade this in the near future but they work for now. As for the type of trails I do I dont think coil overs will be necessary.
What trails are you running on your 35s, 321 gears and dana 30 front axle will coilovers be "necessary"? If your desert prerunning other things on your set up need to be addressed not just coilovers. I think you need to do more research or join a club this way guys with experience will steer you in the right direction. Just saying
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Metalcloak also sells front upper long arm frame brackets. I'm running them because while their radius arm contraption looks interesting, I think the Tennessee mud would ruin them in no time. Here's the MC full 4-link long arm setup:





Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk
Yay...it's like a short arm and a long arm combined.
Just what everyone's looking for, unless they want radius arms of course.

I generally like their stuff, but Metalcloak makes some weird choices :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
Thedirtman I plan on sticking with 35's for now since i still have the stock Dana 30 and the crappy 3.21 gears. I do hope to upgrade this in the near future but they work for now. As for the type of trails I do I dont think coil overs will be necessary.
What trails are you running on your 35s, 321 gears and dana 30 front axle will coilovers be "necessary"? If your desert prerunning other things on your set up need to be addressed not just coilovers. I think you need to do more research or join a club this way guys with experience will steer you in the right direction. Just saying
sorry I might have had some typo issues going, coil overs are not necessary for what I do. I just do some trail rides on the weekends. No dessert running here in WV. Mainly creeks and hills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
We measured like 10" of axle shift with that kit that we installed.
This statement has bothered me. I would like to know what you are calling axle shift. Total front/back movement is about 2” difference between full compression and full droop. There’s a track bar, so what am I missing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
If it’s left to right, then it will perform exactly the same as any suspension that retains the track bar. I still don’t see the amount of movement he is talking about.


This statement has bothered me. I would like to know what you are calling axle shift. Total front/back movement is about 2” difference between full compression and full droop. There’s a track bar, so what am I missing?
Pretty sure he means left to right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,291 Posts
If it’s left to right, then it will perform exactly the same as any suspension that retains the track bar. I still don’t see the amount of movement he is talking about.
That amount of movement will cause quite a bit of undesired crab crawl. Other suspensions try to minimize this by using longer track bars, different brackets or a combination of the two to keep the track bar as parallel as possible at ride height thereby reducing the amount of axle shift during suspension cycle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
So, here is my suspension at full droop. You can see the center of the bump stop pad is roughly 2” from the makeshift plum bob.

Full compression is lined up to the center of the pad.

I don’t see how it could ever get near 10” of front to back movement. The bars that go from the cantilever to the axle wouldn’t work on that either. The further drooped, that bar moves back. I’m real curious to see what your setup looked like to react that way. Do you have any pictures?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
Now Im really scratching my head. What in specifically EVO's geometry would cause that?
Outboard lower control arms that have a lot of downward angle at ride height. This happens when you keep the axle lowers below the axle line, but have the frame lowers up in a high clearance position above the frame rail. Lots of kits have this problem, it's not just EVO. It's what happens when you make a long arm kit but aren't willing to do a ton of fab work to make it awesome, which is obviously what plenty of kits do.

This creates crazy bad rear steer.

Companies like Synergy solve this in their long arm kit by having the frame lowers sitting down below the frames, but then you lose ground clearance.

If you want it all with high ground clearance and low rear steer, you have to have your axle lowers at the axle tube height to keep the links flatter. If you really want to nearly eliminate rear steer, you have to inboard the frame side of the lower control arms, but that obviously means gas tank relocation which the kits just don't want to do. Only one that actually does a truly excellent suspension is the Genright elite kit.


That said, I used to have a lot of rear steer, my RAA angle was double-digit in the rear (recently decreased it a ton but still far from zero). I never had a problem before where I wished I had less rear steer. Sure anyone can find a video of someone rock crawling and say "if they didn't have severe rear steer, it would have done that line". Ok great, but for every one of those videos, you can also come up with a scenario where having rear steer actually helps you keep your line. At the end of the day you just have to know how to drive your rig and compensate for what weird things it's going to do. Nice if you don't have rear steer, but it's not as bad as some people make it out to be in my opinion. There are other much more important reasons to have flat lower links.
 
21 - 40 of 56 Posts
Top