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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well this weekend I installed my E-Code lights. I got a pair of Marchal rally lights and 85watt Osram bulbs along with the assorted install kit from Daniel Stern and Daniel Stern Lighting Consultancy. This required bypassing the lower voltage of the stock lamps to run the new lights off the battery and with 4 times the wire size to handle the power. I figured that since I was going to be wiring relays I might as well get my cowl lamps wired and plan for future lights such as driving, backup and rock lamps.

The first thing that I needed to do was run my trigger wires into the cab to my previously installed switches.


I ran 4 wires (cowl lights, driving lights, rock lights and backup lights) plus 2 trigger switches one from the park lights and one from the high beam as these are the two conditions that I want my lights triggered. I already have constant power from my install of the radios.

Here is my switch array that was previously installed.


I have 6 switches installed and with the 4 I have plans for I have 2 left for whatever.

But I am digressing. I read the information on the Daniel Stern website regarding installation of the E-Code lamps. I also acquired information from various websites and forum contributors regarding the installation of relays on this PCM controlled vehicle. If you simply install a relay on the 2007 Wrangler and it's PCM system, your relays will work but will buzz as the pulse of the electrical system will not keep the relays activated without a gap in voltage causing the relay to turn on and off rapidly which will make a buzz sound and undoubtedly wear out the relay prematurely.

Since I was installing two relays for the head lamps and would be installing more for the additional lights I wanted to install I cut a piece of aluminum stock and bolted 8 relays to it to make my relay group.



In this picture you can see something a little different with the relays as there is a bump on top where a capacitor was installed. The capacitor is what removes the pulse from the PCM electrical system. I installed the capacitors on the top of the relay and folded the wire leads down the sides then soldered them to the tabs of the relay.



The capacitor is directional and must be installed only one way. On the casing of the capacitor you will see an arrow indicating the direction the capacitor is intended to be used. The arrow goes from the positive (trigger) tab labeled 86 to the negative (trigger ground) tab labeled 85. Now that the relay will stop buzzing because you have altered the PCM signal you need to install a diode to make sure this altered signal does not make it back to the computer. A diode is a electrical traffic cop that says one way only. This allows the signal to come in but doesn't let it go back. You can install the diode anywhere you want but I installed mine right on the 86 tab of the relay so now both the capacitor and the diode are right where the relay is and I don't have to wonder if I installed the diode or not sometime later down the road. The diode is also a directional device and must be installed properly to work. On the diode is a white bar to one side of the casing. This white bar goes towards the 86 trigger tab of the relay.



As you can see the diode was soldered to the push tab that goes onto the relay. I folded the diode leads in half to give it a little more strength then added heat shrink tubing to help it a little further. Now in my install the relays will have room below so I didn't need to worry about bending the diode leads or worry about them breaking off due to pushing and pulling on the leads. This is why stranded wire is better than solid wire in automobile installations as the stranded wire tends to bend easier than solid and can take a fair amount of movement without breaking.

Here is the parts I used from Radio Shack.



And what my relay array looked like before I put it in place.



And set down between the battery and fuse box.



So now I am ready to go with all my light additions as the relays are in place and the leads for the driving and rock lamps have already been run to the front of the Jeep. I will add those lights later and will post an install of them when I get it done.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
The rest of the E-Code install is pretty much standard per the instructions given by Daniel Stern. I tapped the high and low beam leads off of the factory harness and used these as my trigger switches for the relays that sends 100% battery power to the head lamps using 12 gauge wire.

The grill comes off really easily. Just carefully unscrew the plastic screws that you can see on top of the grill. These do not back all the way out and once you have them to where they no longer twist out you can pull on them to pull the screw and tab all the way out. Once you have the tabs removed there are spring clips along the bottom of the grill (you can see the spring clip slots in the pictures) and I started from one side and worked my way to the other side. Once the grill is free you can lean it forward and disconnect the turn signal lamps. This uses the same red tab and green plug as does the connectors for the door electrical you need to disconnect when removing the doors. See you manual if you are unsure how to disconnect these plugs.





With the lamps installed waiting for darkness to make my beam adjustments.


Once the beams are adjusted you can re-install the grill.

While I had my center console apart I also finally installed my scanner.



This wasn't where I wanted to put this as I have a remote head for it but this is where it ended up as I didn't want it under the seats because of water crossings and it wouldn't fit in the puny glove box. Even with the remote head I still needed to have access to it to turn it on and off (don't ask me why the power switch on the remote head doesn't turn the scanner itself on and off) so placing it back wasn't going to work either.

Well there it is. If you have any questions please post them and I will do my best to answer them for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Night time shots of the lights

Here are some night time shots of the lights. Since I wasn't using a flash I used the steering wheel to stabilize the camera and didn't shut off the engine so they are a little shaky.

On a slight down hill road.
Low Beam:


Low Beam with factory fogs:


High Beam:


High Beam with KC Daylighters on the cowl:


Now on a flat road after the traffic went by.
Low Beam:


Low Beam with factory fogs:


High Beam:


High Beam with KC Daylighters on the cowl:


I haven't fully optimized the aiming of the lights yet and think I might be able to raise them up a tad.
 

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Man is that a lot of wiring :eek: . I think I would explode if I had to wire up all of that in one sitting. I guess it's a good idea to wire everything prior to getting/installing the lights. Those e-codes seem to be getting more and more popular in the JK world. I wonder how they'd compare to something like the IPF H4 conversions that are offered on Northridge etc. Seems a whole lot easier to deal with, but I am not even sure if those will work as a direct replacement in JKs. I don't see why not it's just a universal 7" driving conversion. Any ideas? Anyways thanks for all the info!

-Living Still
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Any replacement that utilizes the factory wiring will be a whole lot easier to install. However the E-Code lights require more amps to work properly so the factory harness can't be used. Well ok it *could* be used but have a fire extinguisher handy as the amp draw on 85watt lamps is a tad more than a 40-55 watt lamp and the heat generated will probably melt the wires. ;) Literally the wires now giving power to my bulbs is 4 times the size of the factory wiring harness.

These lights, similar to the Cibie E-Codes are designed around rally racing. They are bright and white. They have a sharp cut off which is good for the on coming traffic but once I hit the high beam I can see blue eyes 3-5 miles away. And that is good when driving lonely backroads in Nevada at night.
 

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They have a sharp cut off which is good for the on coming traffic but once I hit the high beam I can see blue eyes 3-5 miles away. And that is good when driving lonely backroads in Nevada at night.
Plastic Jeep grill vs. Deer, Mustang, etc = :(

I will have to get around to doing this sooner or later. The factory lighting is ok, but there is room for improvement and the sharp cut off would also be favorable. I hate getting flashed on the road by those who cannot distinguish between high and low beams!

-Living Still
 

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hate to bump this, but where are the pics? im researching some lighting options... and this thread looks quite informative, just lacking visuals!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Somebody moved things around on my website. The pics are now back. I'll have to go flog the website re-arranger guy now. Oh wait, that's me. Must have just been a slight oversight. ;)
 
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