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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know teraflex has a twist knob style disconnect for their front sway bar, does anybody make one for the rear? I saw Curries AntiRock sway bar, but i do not want that body roll on road or resistance offroad...is there a way to make the teraflex front work in the rear?
 

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With a coil sprung rig you do want roll resistance, both front & rear, on & off road. A "disconnected" JK is like being in a cork bopping on water. When unlatched the TF system just reduces front roll resistance, doesn't eliminate it. It has a smaller bar inside a stiffer, outer tube. Very slick and works great. Their rear bar, just like Currie's, is a mono-rate system. No one to my knowledge makes a dual rate rear bar.

A few options, leave it stock, use Full Tractions 19mm stock style bar, or go all the way and upgrade to TF or Currie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With a coil sprung rig you do want roll resistance, both front & rear, on & off road. A "disconnected" JK is like being in a cork bopping on water. When unlatched the TF system just reduces front roll resistance, doesn't eliminate it. It has a smaller bar inside a stiffer, outer tube. Very slick and works great. Their rear bar, just like Currie's, is a mono-rate system. No one to my knowledge makes a dual rate rear bar.

A few options, leave it stock, use Full Tractions 19mm stock style bar, or go all the way and upgrade to TF or Currie.
the teraflex one you're talking about is the Dual-Rate. they also have a single rate one that is fully connected or fully disconnected using the same system.

http://www.teraflex.biz/new-forged-front-jk-s-t-swaybar-0-3-lift-feb-2011.html

this is the exact one i am talking about, but i was wondering if anyone makes it for the rear.

i want that same system but for the rear, fulled connected on road and fully disconnected off road, not a dual rate.
 

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The teraflex uses the front crossmember bar (the one you cut for a lot of approach angle focused bumpers). Probably a no-go for the rear. Synergy (I think) makes brackets to relocate the factory so the arms are in the right spot. Maybe that would allow you to use your factory rear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The teraflex uses the front crossmember bar (the one you cut for a lot of approach angle focused bumpers). Probably a no-go for the rear. Synergy (I think) makes brackets to relocate the factory so the arms are in the right spot. Maybe that would allow you to use your factory rear.
Are you saying i can use those brackets and put the teraflex fromt swaybar in the rear?
 

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No, you won't be able to use the dual rate in the rear. I guess if you had a friend that removed the bar from the front and then welded it on the back you could. Seems like a lot of work for not that much benefit.

If you want the ability to simply take the rear sway out of the equation why not put some quick disconnect adjustable links on your factory one?
 

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You do not or should not want to run without the influence of a sway bar back there for any reason, whatsoever. The stock sway bar, nor an aftermarket torsion-style bar like the AR will not limit articulation one bit--whether it's there or not, you'll be able to max out your shock travel. You really need to gain a better understanding of the dynamics involved in a link suspension when the axles are articulating if you think you'll gain anything by not running a good torsion-style bar on both ends.

On that note, any product that completely removes the influence of the sway bar with the turn of a knob is drastically overpriced--it's not doing you any good and is far more expensive than other options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You do not or should not want to run without the influence of a sway bar back there for any reason, whatsoever. The stock sway bar, nor an aftermarket torsion-style bar like the AR will not limit articulation one bit--whether it's there or not, you'll be able to max out your shock travel. You really need to gain a better understanding of the dynamics involved in a link suspension when the axles are articulating if you think you'll gain anything by not running a good torsion-style bar on both ends.

On that note, any product that completely removes the influence of the sway bar with the turn of a knob is drastically overpriced--it's not doing you any good and is far more expensive than other options.
I know that the stock bar has very little resistance and wont prevent me from maxing out. But it doesnt help to run fully disconnected in the rear?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Let's start here since this will give me a better idea of your perception on the duties of sway bars--

Why do you think not having sway bars would be beneficial to you?
Well my idea is that not having a rear sway bar will make the rear axle flex easier, not more, but easier. And have to have less influence on the body of the vehicle.

My theory is that since the front is disconnected, any influence the rear swaybar has will be transfered to the body as opposed to the axle moving completeley independently. Correct me if this is wrong
 

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Well my idea is that not having a rear sway bar will make the rear axle flex easier, not more, but easier. And have to have less influence on the body of the vehicle.
So what benefits will this gain you? Conversely, what could this hurt?
My theory is that since the front is disconnected, any influence the rear swaybar has will be transfered to the body as opposed to the axle moving completeley independently. Correct me if this is wrong
Your theory is correct. You're currently running an imbalanced setup, similar to a seesaw with a fat girl on one end and nobody else on the other--no influence from the front to counter the rear. So your course of action is to remove the rear and run free of any sway bars instead of adding a proper front torsion bar, correct?

Have you ever run completely disconnected? Mind you, leaf springs are allowed to do this for a very good reason, the same reason link/coil suspensions absolutely shouldn't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So what benefits will this gain you? Conversely, what could this hurt?

Your theory is correct. You're currently running an imbalanced setup, similar to a seesaw with a fat girl on one end and nobody else on the other--no influence from the front to counter the rear. So your course of action is to remove the rear and run free of any sway bars instead of adding a proper front torsion bar, correct?

Have you ever run completely disconnected? Mind you, leaf springs are allowed to do this for a very good reason, the same reason link/coil suspensions absolutely shouldn't.
No i have never tried. But just to clarify, this is for offroad only, i have no intentions of driving on the road fully disconnected.

Would it be beneficial in anyway to me?

From what i understand, youre saying to run with a front sway bar to equalize it? But that doesnt make sense offroad.
 

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Let me see if I can help a bit without giving the answer away. Don't think about it strictly in terms of how much axle articulation you're getting; but do think about what a sway bar's function is, what could be a possibly downfall of not having one connected in terms of body roll. Also, look ahead, not just that first obstacle that you go over, but what can happen when you go over a series of linked obstacles that will cause repeated compression and droop on both sides and front and rear.

Keep in mind with an AntiRock, while the torsion rate on the sway bar is constant, you can adjust how stiff it is by using the different mounting holes for the sway bar link along the arm.
 

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If it doesn't make sense to you, then you clearly need to do some more homework on good sway bars. Your thinking on the subject is a bit backwards--good sway bars will help you out on the road as much as they will off of it.

These guys don't have any problems.....how often do you think they hit the street? All of them have torsion bars on both ends.

Savvy/Currie KOH LJ


PSC buggy






ArticRubi, good post. Exactly what he needs to consider. Sway bars serve more functions than you're considering, chknkatus.
 

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To add a bit of technical relevance to the discussion, here's an article which specifically addresses finding the center of gravity of your rig and subsequently determining the roll over angles:
http://www.jeepaholics.com/tech/cog/

The clearest example of where it is beneficial to have sway bars connected I can think of is traversing across a hill, perpendicular to the slope. If sway bars are connected, what is the outcome in terms of body roll? More importantly, if sway bars aren't connected, what is the outcome then?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Let me see if I can help a bit without giving the answer away. Don't think about it strictly in terms of how much axle articulation you're getting; but do think about what a sway bar's function is, what could be a possibly downfall of not having one connected in terms of body roll. Also, look ahead, not just that first obstacle that you go over, but what can happen when you go over a series of linked obstacles that will cause repeated compression and droop on both sides and front and rear.

Keep in mind with an AntiRock, while the torsion rate on the sway bar is constant, you can adjust how stiff it is by using the different mounting holes for the sway bar link along the arm.
Reason why i do not want the anti rock is because i dont want the body roll on road
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If it doesn't make sense to you, then you clearly need to do some more homework on good sway bars. Your thinking on the subject is a bit backwards--good sway bars will help you out on the road as much as they will off of it.
This was just something ive had in my mind for a while. I appreciate all the information you guys have. If keeping my stock rear swar bar in offroad is the best thing to do, i have no problem with it
 

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Reason why i do not want the anti rock is because i dont want the body roll on road
Have you actually driven a JK with AR's on both ends on the road before or are you just guessing? I have and it handled wonderfully. That particular rig was running Currie arms, Currie track bars and Fox shocks. I drive my highly modified TJ with AR's on both ends on the road more often than not and would hand over the keys to my grandma without hesitation. Hell, I'll hand the keys to a buddy and tell him to drive it like he stole it....it's that stable. So why would I not worry about it but you would?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Have you actually driven a JK with AR's on both ends on the road before or are you just guessing? I have and it handled wonderfully. That particular rig was running Currie arms, Currie track bars and Fox shocks. I drive my highly modified TJ with AR's on both ends on the road more often than not and would hand over the keys to my grandma without hesitation. Hell, I'll hand the keys to a buddy and tell him to drive it like he stole it....it's that stable. So why would I not worry about it but you would?
Never driven one with antirock. Does it benefit you offroad?
 
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