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Discussion Starter #1
Looking to get my first compound bow

not a hunter
not for competition

just looking to get a nice starter bow for low $ and need some opinions

just target shooting
... and because bullets will run out some time:thefinger:
 

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I've shot a compound bow since I was a young teen. My best advice would be to check out the local outdoor shop and see if they have anything used. You can usually find a whole setup minus arrows for pretty cheap. All the major archery manufacturers make decent bows. If you just buy a bow then start adding accessories the money will start adding up quick.

If you're just target shooting I would look for a single pin fiber optic sight. A good mechanical release can help with consistency. As you are just starting out I would use aluminum arrows instead of carbon. Don't let them talk you into carbon. Thats just extra money you won't see the benefit of. Once you start getting good groups then upgrade. That's all i can think of right now.

Have some questions though:
1) What are you looking at as far as pounds?
2) What weight practice tips do you think you're gonna use?
3) How much do you know about let-off?
4) Single cam or dual cam?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I've shot a compound bow since I was a young teen. My best advice would be to check out the local outdoor shop and see if they have anything used. You can usually find a whole setup minus arrows for pretty cheap. All the major archery manufacturers make decent bows. If you just buy a bow then start adding accessories the money will start adding up quick.

If you're just target shooting I would look for a single pin fiber optic sight. A good mechanical release can help with consistency. As you are just starting out I would use aluminum arrows instead of carbon. Don't let them talk you into carbon. Thats just extra money you won't see the benefit of. Once you start getting good groups then upgrade. That's all i can think of right now.

Have some questions though:
1) What are you looking at as far as pounds?
2) What weight practice tips do you think you're gonna use?
3) How much do you know about let-off?
4) Single cam or dual cam?
1) not to set on pounds somthing with a preety easy draw so i can shoot for a while with out regreting it in the morning dont think i would need more than 40-50lbs
2)no idea
3)a middlle of the road let off would be nice somthing just above the youth bows 70% or so
4)heard some where to go single?

but again i am real new at this

And thanx for the help i may try some swap meets and yard sales
 

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Those questions were just to get a feel of how much you've looked into it. So now I think I can help some more. I can tell you that shooting a bow uses some way different muscles than you workout with on a daily basis. I would probably start with a bow that has a range from 40-60 pound draw weight. Beginning at the 40 and progressing as you get stronger (once I shot for a while my dad got interested in it and tried to pull back my bow. He had probably about 200 pounds on me at the time and he couldn't do it lol).

If you get one with a higher let off you should be able to draw more weight also. 60lb draw with 80% let off you're only holding 12lbs. For comparison I started with a really old Bear that was set at 50lbs and 50% let off. Think I was 13 or so and not a very bog kid at all. I have some tips for when you actually get one to help draw back.

Since you're shooting with a lighter draw weight I would say to look for 100 grain field tips for practice. The whole single or dual cam debate I'm not going to really get into but I would stick with single so you don't have to worry about timing the cams. Last advice is that if you do pick something up from a yard sale/swap meet bring it to a bow-smith and have them check it over and replace the string. Last thing you want is that great deal you got coming apart in your hands.

A couple of links of what you might want to look for:
Link 1

Link 2
 

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Becareful archery can be as bad as jeeping...
Archerytalk.com

What he said lol. I have about 1k in my last bow and it's now considered old tech. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Becareful archery can be as bad as jeeping...
Archerytalk.com
:nono: that is not good to know :):) oh well mabey the wife will stop paying so close attention to my drinking if i have yet another hobby to take our money

Thanx again
 

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Discussion Starter #9
On a side note would a Recurve bow be a better/cheaper place to start ^^^very nice^^
 

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On a side note would a Recurve bow be a better/cheaper place to start ^^^very nice^^
Cheaper? Maybe a little bit. You dont have to buy a sight or mechanical release but you still need arrows, a rest, and some leather fingers (can't remember what they are called at the moment). You're still looking at about the same in investment if you get a quality bow.

Better? Depends on what you are looking at doing. Shooting a recurve takes inherently more natural ability at shooting. When first starting out you will probably only be able to shoot a couple of rounds before you're too fatigued to shoot with any accuracy. It may get frustrating quick, but with practice it will get easier. There is no let off so when you buy a 45-50lb bow, you're holding 45-50lbs when at draw.


In the end it will be up to what you want to do. Any more questions I would be glad to help as much as possible.
 

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I recommend you visit a bow shop and have them set you up. Some folks have to have the newest, latest greatest accessories on their bows. I have had one of mine for 30 years and the other for about 15. They both kill deer and targets just fine. Or you could just get a crossbow. I think my crossbow is a hell of a lot funner to shoot than the bows.
 

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I recommend you visit a bow shop and have them set you up. Some folks have to have the newest, latest greatest accessories on their bows. They both kill deer and targets just fine.
You kill your targets...what arrows are you using? Mine keep coming back for more...I have this pesky 3D that won't die!! J/K

I have to agree with warcop...a bow shop will size you for the draw length, weight, give you a bunch to try, and may even have a few nice "used" bows that shoot just fine. My first bow I bought was a trade in on the "newest, latest and greatest" it was a great bow, I had it for 9 years before I ever bought my first Brand New bow.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanx for the input we have a archery team and facility near me so I may go check them out but my $$$$$ situation kind of went south since I first posted this so its on the back burnner for now.
 

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Bows

I am an avid archer, And I would definitely would say stay away from a cross bow unless you have shoulder issues. If I wanted to shoot a gun then that is what I would buy instead of a crossbow. But definitely go to your local archery shop to get correct draw link size to you. Also they will ask if you will be shooting with a release or not. I prefer a release. But if you are looking at a new bow be prepared to spend any where from $500.00 and up to $1500.00. for a good bow. And I would not worry about single cam versus dual cams. The archery shop can get you dialed in. And as far as draw weight goes I would pick a bow that has room for adjusting for your draw length and draw weight. I personally like my Hoyt. I have a compound and a re-curve, both are Hoyt's. Happy bow hunting.
 

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First off, learn how to draw, hold, sight, and release the bow. Many new folks pull and hold with their shoulder, not their back. Using the back muscles really helps steady your hold. Picture pinching your shoulder blades together. You can get an old crappy grip and a rubber stretchy exercise band to help learn w/o killing your arrows.

I started with a Mathews DXT with a 60 pound draw weight. It was perfect. Try out some bows. Find a local (even if you have to drive a bit) archery shop with a bow smith. Get them to help show you how to draw, hold, and shoot. This will save your forearm and help you learn good form. It is hard to "relearn" if you start off doing it wrong. Your draw length is another important factor. The show can measure your draw length and make sure your bow is setup for you. I would also recommend getting a release. Try out some various releases. I use a T handle now started with a wrist strap type.

At some point you should look at fletching your own arrows. This will shift into learning about arrow shaft spline, tip weight, nock type, fletching type, and fletching angles.

Don't let all this intimidate you. Once you understand the basics just get out and let 'er rip. It may sound funny but start at about 10 yards. You really need to work on form starting off. As mentioned before, spend some time on archery talk to learn.

A quick list of what you should look at starting off:
- bow with draw weight you are comfortable with a grip which fits your hand.
- arrow rest. I like the full capture rests.
- peep sight. I like the hooding ones with different size apertures.
- front sight. I use an adjustable 3 pin.
- release. Not required but very helpful. loop for the release
- arrows. a quiver is a good purchase as well. start with a dozen
- string lube
- target. Start with a cheap one. I like the spyderweb targets but start with a cheaper one. This is only if you will be shooting on your own. Be sure to know what is beyond your target and shoot safely! I have a swamp behind mine. No arrow recovery for baaaaad shots but safe.

Your local bow shop should be able to set all this up. Be sure to ask questions and learn everything you can about what they are doing and how they do it.
 

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my baby...







2014 Bear Agenda 7
- Spot Hogg Hogg-It 5 pin /w bulletproof pins (front sight)
- Trophy Ridge Revolution 2.0 (arrow rest)
- 3/16" G5 Meta Peep (peep sight)
- Trophy Ridge 9" Static Stabilizer /w Doinker QD
- Trophy Ridge Arrow Cage (quiver)
- Vapor Trail Custom Strings
- BowJax Limb Dampeners
- TPU String Sleeves

she will sling a 420 grain arrow @ 327 fps

i'm also on ArcheryTalk.com under this same name.
 
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