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Discussion Starter #1
Have any of you folks wired in an auto cut off for your air compressors?

Being the old phocker that I am who drinks too much beer and uses too much cilantro on his tacos, I hate sitting there during air up.

I am thinking to fab up a manifold with four quick disconnects at each wheel that will stay on while airing up.

The other thought I had was to wire in an air pressure switch so that the compressor could shut off at say 30 or 32 psi and then just shut off when done.

in looking for a switch, I found this interesting doomaflatchi. Any feedback on this or a reference to a different switch?

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MOIRS9M


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MIV6P6W
 

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Discussion Starter #5
why not just run a regulator? Thats basically what you are talking about right?
Yeah, a regulator that also shuts the compressor off.

McMaster-Carr has a number of switches available too that are less than the German one above.

I think the Buick GN guys were using switches like these to trigger their alcohol injection.
 

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A regulator can be set to your desired psi then once the tire is full the compressor will fill until it hit its shut off psi point. No reason for a switch or any wiring with it.
Yep, that's the easy way to do it. Someone already mentioned 2 Way Air, but here's a link to the system page: https://www.wildboaroffroad.com/2WayAir-Tire-Pressure-System-Base-p/2wds0.htm. Hooks up all 4 tires to fill at once with locking chucks and QD hose attachments at all 4 corners. Airs down as well as up. If you're handy you could probably put a plumbing system together for a lot less, but if you don't have time, or are motivationally challenged, this might be a good solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
awe crap.... thanks doods. I was being a dumbass and forgot about the pressure switch that I already have on the ARB. I have a small micro switch that turns on my compressor that is mounted into an existing hole on the drivers side, outer seat slider rail (stationary part). For some reason, I completely eliminated that pressure switch in my brain's schematic.

So yeah, dirtman. a simple air pressure regulator is the best approach for what I want to do and I think I saw some smaller sized regulators that might work inside the cab.

Yeah, two way air but I was just going to fab up my own manifold thingy using goodyear hoses, distribution blocks and a liquid filled gauge from amazon for about the same price. I thin I can source and use the same parts that the two way air kit uses for less money. Similar quick disconnects for the vinyl tubing are used with water methanol systems.

I'll take a closer look at two way air.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So I am looking at these two lock-on type air chucks. I ordered one of each of the following and plan on doing air down time experiments between the two.

I think the second one fits my beadlocks a bit better but the first one seems a bit more stout and slightly more suited for trail duty.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008PZ7LMW

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AZJYDQI


Oh, and hey, @thedirtman, I am thinking that an air pressure regulator might impede air flow to some degree, no? With an electrical switch type regulator wired in series between the pump and my micro switch, I speculate that I might see faster air up times.
 

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Discussion Starter #12

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I had an ARB style chuck fall apart on me so I replaced it with the push on style in your first link. Haven't had any issues with it and it seems to grab the threads on the valve stem better.
 

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Hey Paul,

I have the chuck like your second link (the CTA), and it has served me without fail. It looks like you're going with a regulator rather than pressure switch (keep going that way! :D ). A regulator will slow down filling but will make it a walk away and contemplate your Corona type of deal.

One thing I learned via experimentation: you need some (even small) tank volume upstream of regulator or your compressor will get hammered doing the on-off-on thing.
I'm guessing a half-gallon or even a quart of tank capacity would be enough to keep the compressor from acting like it's on a turn signal flasher.

When I added hydro assist and lost my tank location behind the radiator, I tried no tank and a regulator set to street pressure . . . for about 5 minutes :laughing:. Then I ditched the regulator until I could finger out where to huck a tank out back. Now I have tank volume, but usually don't use the regulator because it costs time. The regulator has male and female couplers on it now, so I can plug it inline whenever I want it to take longer :thefinger:
 

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Hey Paul,

I have the chuck like your second link (the CTA), and it has served me without fail. It looks like you're going with a regulator rather than pressure switch (keep going that way! :D ). A regulator will slow down filling but will make it a walk away and contemplate your Corona type of deal.

One thing I learned via experimentation: you need some (even small) tank volume upstream of regulator or your compressor will get hammered doing the on-off-on thing.
I'm guessing a half-gallon or even a quart of tank capacity would be enough to keep the compressor from acting like it's on a turn signal flasher.

When I added hydro assist and lost my tank location behind the radiator, I tried no tank and a regulator set to street pressure . . . for about 5 minutes :laughing:. Then I ditched the regulator until I could finger out where to huck a tank out back. Now I have tank volume, but usually don't use the regulator because it costs time. The regulator has male and female couplers on it now, so I can plug it inline whenever I want it to take longer :thefinger:
Good info! Thanks for posting. Will save me some frustration down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hey Ex,

My compressor is the ARB twin so it runs continuously while I am airing up. Once 30psi is hit, I want it to shut off electrically. I don't have a tank now so am not convinced that I need once.

I have seen this kind of thing at some gas stations where the pump shits off at like 32 so you don't over fill the tires. No cycling, though there could have been a small tank inside the metal box.

How much cycling do you think might happen at air up? The ump will run until the tires are full. My line leaks a little so I do get a little cycling if I just leave the hose there, not using it, but it is minimal and I expect the same at air up time.
 

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Hey Ex,

My compressor is the ARB twin so it runs continuously while I am airing up. Once 30psi is hit, I want it to shut off electrically. I don't have a tank now so am not convinced that I need once.

I have seen this kind of thing at some gas stations where the pump shits off at like 32 so you don't over fill the tires. No cycling, though there could have been a small tank inside the metal box.

How much cycling do you think might happen at air up? The ump will run until the tires are full. My line leaks a little so I do get a little cycling if I just leave the hose there, not using it, but it is minimal and I expect the same at air up time.
Hey, give it a shot without a tank, and I hope you don't experience the same thing I did.

What I found is that with < 1/4 cup of collective "tank volume" upstream of the regulator (volume of fittings between comp. and reg.), the upstream side goes from ~30 PSI to shutoff PSI in a stroke or 2, and that 30 PSI air is a tad lazy flowing through 10+ feet of small-diameter hose, so the comp. plays ping-pong more than I wanted to see.

I think a small, light tank [maybe a paintball CO2 tank that's beyond hydro cert (therefore free/cheap) or an empty 14-16 oz propane bottle (totally free, with bonus redneck "street cred." :D ] adapted to a push-to-connect fitting and plumbed in with a bit of 3/8" air brake tubing would calm it right down.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey, give it a shot without a tank, and I hope you don't experience the same thing I did.

What I found is that with < 1/4 cup of collective "tank volume" upstream of the regulator (volume of fittings between comp. and reg.), the upstream side goes from ~30 PSI to shutoff PSI in a stroke or 2, and that 30 PSI air is a tad lazy flowing through 10+ feet of small-diameter hose, so the comp. plays ping-pong more than I wanted to see.

I think a small, light tank [maybe a paintball CO2 tank that's beyond hydro cert (therefore free/cheap) or an empty 14-16 oz propane bottle (totally free, with bonus redneck "street cred." :D ] adapted to a push-to-connect fitting and plumbed in with a bit of 3/8" air brake tubing would calm it right down.

Thanks man. Good tidbit. I have been thinking about adding that little ARB tank and high temp hose kit under the seat with the compressor. Probably a paint ball one will be cheaper.

edit: did not think of the propane bottle. Also a good idea. I actually just picked up one of those little brass adapters and refilled all my empty green propane bottles from the larger tank that I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So I grabbed a beer and both of these chucks and went over to the spare tire and conducted a little flow test.

The round one flows a lot more air than the one with the lever. I tried to measure the time it took to deflate the tires but got distracted and sis not get good results. It was still obvious just popping only the chucks onto the valve stem. Nothing was connected to the chucks so they were just being used as deflators.
 
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