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Discussion Starter #1
Can you mix and match suspension systems???

Would it be beneficial?

I have a superlift 4" suspension lift with quick discos. However I now want to do the control arms. Can i put aftermarket control arms on there without replacing the whole superlift?
 

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This is a really good question and one that I think is often overlooked in the Jeep world.

The key thing is to keep in mind your suspension is a SYSTEM. It is not how each individual part operates, it is how the suspension parts work in relation to each other. It may not be as evident on a lifted Jeep but it still is.

The nice thing about having a suspension system made as a kit by a single company. If it is a decent company, then they should have tested thier own system and matched up spring rates, valving and other details making the system work together as a whole. Don't be fooled though, a lot of companies sell kits and a lot of time it is just pieced together and not a specific kit. Right now I like Poly P and R.E.

With all that said, I am peicing together a lift with mix matched parts, lol. Mix and matching would normally not be a benifit, buying a whole kit would be the best.

To answer your question though, Arms are no big deal. YOu could add whatever arms you like and it should work fine with your system.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response,

Would it be beneficial to the suspension though? With purchasing upper and lower arms, would this help on the road-off road-etc.

What would be the benefits to spending close to 7 or 8 hundred.

whereas I could spend this money else were on say gears or axles of such.
 

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There really is not any difference in off the shelf springs. There is a quite a bit of difference in control arms. Different material, different joints. Find the CA's that are going to work with waht you intend on doing.
 

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Lower arms are good because they are stronger then stock and you can get some with a different joint rather then a rubber bushing, such as the R.E. arms that uise spherical joints. You will flex a little easier and won't give up that much ride quality. They where slightly louder on my XJ but that was a unibody.

The uppers are mostly good for the adjustability. So you can set proper pinion angels. With a four inch lift you may want to consider UCA's to set it up properly.

I do have to disagree with the off the shelf spring comment though. I have found there to be a huge difference between springs. I am always amazed on how much they can change different characteristcs, how they are measured, how fast they sag, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input. Next question is what UCAs would you recommend
 

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I do have to disagree with the off the shelf spring comment though. I have found there to be a huge difference between springs. I am always amazed on how much they can change different characteristcs, how they are measured, how fast they sag, etc.
You would be very surprised to find out that most springs are manufactured by the same companies and then rebadged.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
where is PHIL!!!!!!
 

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I read somewhere that he is now almost all Poly Performance Stage III. I think the only think left not Poly is some Superlift Rock Runner lower control arms. Don't quote me on this, but I think thats the deal.
Correct, I started with a Superlift 4" kit as it was one of the few available 16 months ago. I started swapping out the parts I didn't like pretty much on day 1. I've ran a mix of Superlift, Teraflex, Skyjacker, and Poly Performance parts over the last year. Apart from the Superlift RockRunner lower control arms, which I really like, everything is now Poly Performance, and pretty much a Stage III kit with Fox adjustable CD shocks.

I like the RockRunner lower control arms due to the front ones having a dog leg, rubber bushings at both ends, and the fact they swivel in the middle, but if I were buying LCA's today I would buy Poly Perfomance. Anyone who's spent any time adjusting control arms, will tell you that being able to adjust the control arms while they are in place makes the task so much easier. I run their UCA's and really like them. Poly also make damn good stuff.

Any control arm you buy should have a rubber bushing at one end, otherwise you'll feel the road way more than you need to.

There is no problem with mixing and matching parts, but spending some time thinking through what you are doing will pay dividends in the long run. In particular giving some thought to roll center, steering geometry, and sway bar geometry will pay off in terms of handling.

Some good monotube shocks will help with the ride, but don't always accept the lift manufacturers recommendation, the Bilstein shocks that came with my Superlift kit are now on a 4" lifted TJ as they were too short for my JK.

There are other small things you can improve over time, like using the factory upper bump stops instead of those big long upper ones, which have a tendency to break off or slip off the lower bump stop. Then use large lower bump stops like the Poly Performance ones.
 

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You would be very surprised to find out that most springs are manufactured by the same companies and then rebadged.
True, but they are not all the same rate and you have progressive, non-progressive, etc, and other differentiating factors. Superlift 4" springs actually contribute to a nice ride, but as a result of being a little soft they suffer when you had extra weight, winches. bumpers etc, and many people resort to adding spacers to compensate. The Poly springs are progressive and if I were to guess a higher soring rate than the SL ones. You lose some of the comfort contributed by the SL springs, but from my experience you gain in terms of handling and less sag. So yes, many springs may be manufactured by the same company, but this does not mean they are all the same.
 

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Would it be beneficial to the suspension though? With purchasing upper and lower arms, would this help on the road-off road-etc.
Yes, after market control arms will allow for more rotational flex at least at one end. This will usually give you better flex of the axle. I noticed a big difference in flex when installing after market control arms.

They obviously also let you dial in pinion angles, caster, etc, a lot better.


What would be the benefits to spending close to 7 or 8 hundred.
Could even be more than that depending on which arms you go with. The way I would look at it, is that it would be taking your suspension system to the next stage. More adjustable, better flex, more strength, etc.


whereas I could spend this money else were on say gears or axles of such.
This is where I think you have to prioritize what is important to you, and tackle these upgrades in your order of priority.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well that sums it up. Thanks Phil and I have been looking at the poly performance vs. the rockrunners. Im leaning more towards the polys.

If I throw the UCAs in will i have to constantly play with the caster and pinion angles and such?
 

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If I throw the UCAs in will i have to constantly play with the caster and pinion angles and such?
Not once you got it dialed in correctly, which is sometimes easy and sometimes takes a little longer. However, as and when you add things like bumpers/winches/etc the change in ride height will have an effect on the suspension geometry, sometimes this is marginal and no adjustment is needed, other times you are better served by making the necessary adjustments.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks Phil
 
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