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So over this last trip, my ac compressor pulley bearing decided it was time to start screaming at me. With a bit of research, I discovered that the clutch was NOT rebuildable and my only option was to replace the compressor ($500 for the part)....

With that in mind, I made it my goal to prove Jeep wrong, and rebuild it anyways, and I am happy to announce that it IS doable! for only $50 in parts!

first step for the job for me was to remove the clutch face on the front of the compressor. This was honestly the hardest part, but with a little bit of tinkering, I was able to fabricate a tool to remove it. use a 10mm socket for this. (be sure to not lose the spacers that are hiding in between the front plate and the compressor shaft)




This was created with a simple piece of bar steel, some 6-32 x 1-3/4" bolts and nuts.

Once you get the first plate off, be sure to remove the snap ring holding in the main pulley, and once its clear. pry it off. I broke a screwdriver doing this, but you really want to by careful to not mess up the shaft that the bearing is on.




Once you get the pulley off, you will notice that it was peened on. and is something of a hard to come by bearing. I was able to find a replacement by going to a bearing specialty store in my hometown.



Bearing part number was: Nachi 35BG05S16G-2DL

simply press out the old bearing and press in the new one. I used a 1-5/16' impact socket to press it out and a 1-3/8 to press the new one in.



You do need to use some retaining compound because you cant re-peen the pulley. Loctite 609 works great for this.



Once you have let the new bearing with the retaining compound dry for 24 hrs, reinstall the parts in reverse order of how they came apart.

Done, you have now replaced a pulley that would have cost you $500 if left to a jeep dealer for only $50. Happy wrenching! :)
 

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Very nice.
Why can't you re-peen the bearing in place? A rounded punch will do a fine job of displacing a little metal, between the original peen locations.
 

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Very nice.
Why can't you re-peen the bearing in place? A rounded punch will do a fine job of displacing a little metal, between the original peen locations.
To some degree, yes, but the metal that had been bent over the outer race was pushed back out when you press the old bearing out you can press it back with a punch, but it is significantly weaker. The compound does the same job, is reasonably cheap, and will be more reliable than re-peening it in.

Unless you are thinking of making entirely new peens... not sure if that's even really doable...
 

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To some degree, yes, but the metal that had been bent over the outer race was pushed back out when you press the old bearing out you can press it back with a punch, but it is significantly weaker. The compound does the same job, is reasonably cheap, and will be more reliable than re-peening it in.

Unless you are thinking of making entirely new peens... not sure if that's even really doable...
Yes, I mentioned peening between the original locations. It's very doable. I've done it many times. Reliability? You still had to press out the old bearing, right?
 

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Yes, I mentioned peening between the original locations. It's very doable. I've done it many times. Reliability? You still had to press out the old bearing, right?
Really now? I wouldn't have though that it would be all that easy to do honestly, given the amount of force required to smash it in like that. I stand corrected though. Just a punch and hammer?
 

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Really now? I wouldn't have though that it would be all that easy to do honestly, given the amount of force required to smash it in like that. I stand corrected though. Just a punch and hammer?
The amount of area displaced is small, so the hammer blow is "amplified". Have the hub on a solid surface, as you would when pressing the bearing in.

I'm not saying the Loctite 609 isn't a good way to go.
I just wanted to point out that re-peening is also a good option.
 

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The amount of area displaced is small, so the hammer blow is "amplified". Have the hub on a solid surface, as you would when pressing the bearing in.

I'm not saying the Loctite 609 isn't a good way to go.
I just wanted to point out that re-peening is also a good option.
Thanks for the heads up. Im still learning new things as I go as well, so pointers are always appreciated. This entire project was a learning experience!:thankyou:
 

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Great write-up! Saves you from opening up the system too.

:beer:
 
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