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post #1 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 10:32 AM Thread Starter
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Let's talk tools!

To work on your truck, you need tools, some are good, some are bad, and some are just plain crap.

Everyone's got their own thoughts on what are good tools, some think Stanley are best thing since sliced bread, others won't pick it up unless it says Mac, Matco or Snap-On on it.

FWIW Here's my thoughts on the tools I use;

Craftsman - Make good tools, but the quality seems to have dropped off over recent years. Great place to buy one off hard to find tools and some of their sets are good value. The no hassle lifetime guarantee is a big plus.

Kobalt (Lowes) - As good as Craftsman, and some tool like ratchets are most probably better. Lifetime warranty, never tried to use it, so don't know how hassle free it is.

Taskforce (Lowes) - Lowes budget tools, good value and with a lifetime warranty. Better than the cheap tools included in those kits made by Cresent, Allied, Channelock, etc. I carry a Taskforce 160 pc tool kit in my Jeep.

Husky (Home Depot) - Similar to Taskforce, some of the Husky Pro tools are almost as good as Craftsman and Kobalt. Their Husky Pro torque wrenches are good value for money and well made.

Pittsburgh (Harbor Freight) - Don't discount Harbor Freight tools, their ratchets are crap, but sockets are not that bad. Some of their wrenches are pretty good, especially their Pittsburgh Pro line. Great place for tools that you don't use that often, as well as pullers, specialist wrenches, etc.

Stanley - Okay quality and well priced, some of their tools are not that bad, others are not that good.

Proto, Mac, Matco, Snap-On, SK, etc - Great if you rely on tools for your living, but over priced in my view (for home use) and not necessary for the home mechanic.

I generally buy Kobalt and Craftsman these days, but have plenty of Husky, Taskforce and Pittsburgh tools.

Ratchets are most probably one of the tools you need to be the most reliable, and I'd go for Kobalt first, then Craftsman (or better).

If sockets or wrenches start getting deformed or misshaped, ditch them, (and maybe use the rest of that set as "back up" tools). Avoid ratchets, adjustables, etc with rubber handles, they usually come off just when you don't want them to.

Never use the wrong size socket or wrench on a nut or bolt, get the right size tool for the job. Have at least one set of sockets and wrenches that includes all sizes and doesn't miss out sizes.

Finally, buy some decent mechanics gloves and use them, your knuckles will thank you.

--

Apart from a few specialist tool manufacturers, nearly all USA made tools are made by three companies. Although a few brands have changed supplier over the years, I think this is correct.

Stanley - Stanley, Husky, Mac, Proto

Danaher - Craftsman, Kobalt, Matco, Armstrong, Napa, Gear Wrench

Snap-On - Snap-On, JH Williams, Bahco, ATI

It's worth noting that just because they are made by the same company doesn't mean they are the same quality, although some brands like Kobalt and Craftsman are very similar quality. All of the above also have budget brands, which are manufactured overseas mainly Taiwan.
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post #2 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 10:57 AM
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Great post PhilD!!!

I have a Snap-On Roll Away full of Snap-On and MATCO tools that is probably worth as much as my Jeep... LOL!

I have the piece of mind knowing I can bear down on my ratchet or breaker bar and they aren't going to fail or the socket isn't going to split make my hand look like hamburger. That has happened to me more times than I care to remember with Craftsmen Tools.

Albeit, I made my living with my tools for a while and Snap-On, MATCO and MAC maybe overkill for the home user... I would still get my key tools such as sockets and rachets from one of those companies and fill the rest of the box with Craftsmen or the like.

And try to use 12 point sockets AS LEAST AS POSSIBLE on regular bolts and just use them for the 12 point fasteners.
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Originally Posted by HITMONEY View Post
I have a Snap-On Roll Away full of Snap-On and MATCO tools that is probably worth as much as my Jeep... LOL!
I can believe that! Those things are pricey, but if you use them every day worth the investment.


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And try to use 12 point sockets AS LEAST AS POSSIBLE on regular bolts and just use them for the 12 point fasteners.
Good advice, I'll always use a 6 sided socket if I can.
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post #4 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 11:13 AM
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I was a Chrysler Dealer Tech for a brief stint, then moved to a Audi, VW, Porsche, Peugeot dealer and became a Porsche Certified Tech... me and the Snap-On guy had a love hate relationship.. I loved the tools but hated giving him half my weekly pay EVERY WEEK for a year. This is back in 91, I can't even imagine what a top of the line Snap-On rachet cost now.. back then it was over $150 if I remember correctly... and mine all still look new.

The only thing I took away from that brief career choice was a nice set of tools.
I decided I would rather take a shot being able to own a new 911 one day instead of working on other people's. Worked out pretty good, bought a 993 Cabriolet 5 years later. The Porsche I no longer have... the tools I do and I will never part with them.

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post #5 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 11:16 AM
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Tried torquing a 13/ 16 track bar bolt using a 12 side socket. When it got to about 100 lbs the socket fractured in three places. Along with it, I bashed the tip of my finger above the nail- enough that it bled underneath the nail. Finally fell off a few weeks ago. One painful experience to teach me "The right tool for the job." I guess I still like the Craftsman policy of on the spot replacement- no receipt/ no questions.

So Phil- I was going to upgrade my torque wrench to a Snap-on fixed ratcheting unit for approx $275. I never pulled the trigger on this due to the price. You think that a "weekend/ softcore" mechanic would be OK with the $75 Husky? Will be used mainly for wheels, control arms, track bars, tierods, etc...That kind of thing. Main concern is how well they stay calibrated, and who will calibrate it if needed.
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post #6 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 11:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StubEXrube View Post
Tried torquing a 13/ 16 track bar bolt using a 12 side socket. When it got to about 100 lbs the socket fractured in three places. Along with it, I bashed the tip of my finger above the nail- enough that it bled underneath the nail. Finally fell off a few weeks ago. One painful experience to teach me "The right tool for the job." I guess I still like the Craftsman policy of on the spot replacement- no receipt/ no questions.

So Phil- I was going to upgrade my torque wrench to a Snap-on fixed ratcheting unit for approx $275. I never pulled the trigger on this due to the price. You think that a "weekend/ softcore" mechanic would be OK with the $75 Husky? Will be used mainly for wheels, control arms, track bars, tierods, etc...That kind of thing. Main concern is how well they stay calibrated, and who will calibrate it if needed.

Not to answer for Phil but the Husky or a Craftsmen should do you well. Always keep it stored unloaded and it should stay within tolerance for a long time, especially if seldom used. I always keep a good coating of WD-40 or similiar on it to displace moisture and keep it in a plastic box... not metal.
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post #7 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 01:00 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HITMONEY View Post
Not to answer for Phil but the Husky or a Craftsmen should do you well. Always keep it stored unloaded and it should stay within tolerance for a long time, especially if seldom used. I always keep a good coating of WD-40 or similiar on it to displace moisture and keep it in a plastic box... not metal.
X2

I have the Husky 1/2" and 3/8" torque wrenches and they are pretty accurate and good value for money, and they come with plastic boxes. They are very similar to the "low end" Kobalt and Craftsman units and cost about 30% less. I've compared the accuracy with $200+ Craftsman ones and they are damn close.
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post #8 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 01:31 PM
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if you are only using the torque wrench for control arms/track bars/lug nuts, then there is no need to spend $275. a $50 one will be close enough for that application.
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post #9 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 01:55 PM
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I've made my living with tools for 15yrs then put them down to supervise. I prefer snap-on ratchets, although the Husky impressed me and feels like they have better tooth count. MAC Combo wrenches are great for big hands and some of the older snap-on closed ends have the same square handle. To me tools are like gold, if you ever lose your job you can always make money with them.

Just like PhilD said if your buying for the house pretty much any major hardware store tool will due, and somtimes they can work for the job. To me its all about feel and some of the other tools hurt when used repeatedly. "I hate Snap-on combo wrenches" they cut into my hands; craftsman pro has followed in their footsteps.

The ultimate toolbox tool is the Snap-on ratcheting screwdriver. No one makes one like it, and mine sees more use then any other tool in the box.

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post #10 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 02:42 PM
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For what it is worth guys, i am now working for a supply house that is very large and stocks just about anything you guys could want, i am going to get a vendors star so i can hook you guys up with some really good pricing on tools. i am in the process of getting our website and ebay store going. if you guys need something let me know. On the other hand if you guys have any advice i will take it! A lot of the Colorado guys know and i think they would vouch for me when i say i am a pretty honest guy.


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post #11 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 03:15 PM
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I've always used craftsman for the mainstream tools. Like Phil said, some HF tools, the ones I don't use very often. My Dad bought me a set 16 years ago. I replaced the 1/2 ratchet a few years ago and the 3/8 just this year. I also bought a new 263 piece set for something like 160 bucks on sale. It had many of the socket sizes that my other 16 year old 100 some odd piece set didn't have. It's now my back up and will stay with me since Dad bought it for me. I know, it's just a tool set, but it was my first one .

Like others have said...for the weekend warrior Craftsman, Kobalt, etc will do just fine. I'd love to have a nice set of Snap-On, but $$$$$$.

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post #12 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 03:24 PM
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I have a little bit of everything. All my air tools, cordless stuff, screwdrivers, and misc stuff is Mac and SNap on.

my sockets are all Craftsman. My wrenches are all craftsman and I have specialty MAc wrenches as well.

All pliers are Mac and I have about everything they make

my roll away is a big MAc roll away.

other then that I have a little bit of everything. About 20k worth and my box is about 6-7k

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post #13 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 05:23 PM
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I heard Kobalt is Snap-ons public or generic brand. Also I heard Husky is made by Craftsman.
Anyway, 99% of my auto tools are Craftsman because there are Sears almost everywhere and even now that K-mart bought Sears you can always replace tools quickly when the need arises. And they are of good quality.
I fell in love with Klein hand tools and especially their screwdrivers because of the comfortable ergonomic grip, and it's what I use as an electrician.

I've been wrenchin' on stuff since a wee boy(like I'm sure most here have) and learned early to know where your hand will go if a tool fails or slips.
Life is too short for cheap tools. All my power tools are Milwaukee, Green Lee, Craftsman, or Delta.

Harbor Freight/Pittsburgh tools should never be trusted and only used for jobs when you know you will be modifiying or destrying a tool to get some certain job done. Or when I have some weird one time job to do and/or am broke.
Well, I have a cherry picker, engine stand, and parts washer from them that have held up well.

I inherited some trick Xcelite and Mac tools when my Dad passed on but I don't really use them. Too sentimental I guess. He worked on F-15 avionics for 35 years. Love em while ya got em.
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post #14 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 05:38 PM Thread Starter
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I heard Kobalt is Snap-ons public or generic brand. Also I heard Husky is made by Craftsman.
Snap-On used to make Kobalt, but it is now made by Danaher, same company that makes Craftsman. Kobalt tools are predominantly made in the USA, Snap-On's entry level brands, like Blue Point, are made in Taiwan. Kobalt is Lowes premium brand of tools, Taskforce is their budget (imported) line. Husky is made by by Stanley, as are Mac and Proto.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilD View Post
Snap-On used to make Kobalt, but it is now made by Danaher, same company that makes Craftsman. Kobalt tools are predominantly made in the USA, Snap-On's entry level brands, like Blue Point, are made in Taiwan. Kobalt is Lowes premium brand of tools, Taskforce is their budget (imported) line. Husky is made by by Stanley, as are Mac and Proto.
A lot of power tools for quite a few companies are rebeanded from a company here in vegas

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post #16 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 05:53 PM
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GREAT thread idea Phil. I may buy the Husky or Craftsman torque wrench this weekend. I love playing with my tools when my girlfriend is out of town. Ummm...that sounded kinda bad...lol.
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post #17 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 05:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilD View Post
Snap-On used to make Kobalt, but it is now made by Danaher, same company that makes Craftsman. Kobalt tools are predominantly made in the USA, Snap-On's entry level brands, like Blue Point, are made in Taiwan. Kobalt is Lowes premium brand of tools, Taskforce is their budget (imported) line. Husky is made by by Stanley, as are Mac and Proto.
Sweet, thanks for the info. I knew someone would know about that.
I've found Husky and Craftsman ratchet sets to be about the same quality.
I have a few old obscure Blue point tools that were made in USA but it seems a lot of good brands are being made over seas. Even my new Milwaukee bat/power tools say made in china on them which totally pisses me off.
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post #18 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 05:59 PM
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What are some good ideas/ complete start up kits/ brands/ models...regarding impact tools?
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post #19 of 47 Old 10-31-2008, 09:39 PM
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I prefer Snap-On for hand tools, Makita or Dewalt for electric and C.P. for air tools


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post #20 of 47 Old 11-02-2008, 09:01 AM
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Here in Canada we have Grey Tools wich are also a premium like Snap-On or Mac. Highly regarded and no hassle lifetime waranty as well. We also have MasterCraft which are distributed by Canadian Tire. I believe they are made by Grey as well.

I got most of my tools 30 years ago when I was in the trade and still use them on a regular basis. Well worth it in the long run to get good tools.

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post #21 of 47 Old 11-02-2008, 05:47 PM
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Thanks for the great information.

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post #22 of 47 Old 11-04-2008, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StubEXrube View Post
Tried torquing a 13/ 16 track bar bolt using a 12 side socket. When it got to about 100 lbs the socket fractured in three places. Along with it, I bashed the tip of my finger above the nail- enough that it bled underneath the nail. Finally fell off a few weeks ago. One painful experience to teach me "The right tool for the job." I guess I still like the Craftsman policy of on the spot replacement- no receipt/ no questions.

So Phil- I was going to upgrade my torque wrench to a Snap-on fixed ratcheting unit for approx $275. I never pulled the trigger on this due to the price. You think that a "weekend/ softcore" mechanic would be OK with the $75 Husky? Will be used mainly for wheels, control arms, track bars, tierods, etc...That kind of thing. Main concern is how well they stay calibrated, and who will calibrate it if needed.
Watch out for the Craftsman torque wrenches with plastic handle and etched and paint filled numbers. I bought a 3/8 drive a couple years ago and after a few uses the paint all came off. The numbers are very hard to read now. Also they only carry a 90 day warranty (unlike their other hand tools).

I've always liked the quality of Proto, but may try the Kobalt for my next 1/2" drive.

-------------
Another quick note: If you don't already have air, consider an electric impact wrench. I wasn't ready to spend the money for a good air compressor with all the accessories but found myself needing an impact quite often. I got the 1/2" drive Dewalt last year. It has advertised torque of 345 ft-lbs. It has held up quite well so far.

........My other hobbies include: Older cars and trucks; Spending money on unfinished projects, and continuing to not finish them...

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post #23 of 47 Old 11-04-2008, 09:22 AM
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Sears even told me that if I needed it recalibrated that they would have to ship it. They said they didn't know where it would be shipped, how long it would take, or how much it would cost (after the 90 days). WTF Sears- I couldn't believe how their quality (and especially customer service) seems to have plummeted. I was very disappointed at their unwillingness to answer my questions. I will NOT buy a torque wrench there. They also sold me a generator a few years back- I specifically asked them that- if I didnt use it within 90 days - Could I bring it back for a full return. They stated AND WROTE ON THE RECEIPT...that if I "didn't put oil or gas in it, then retun within 90 days for a full refund". When I went to return it less than 90 days later with no use / never filled/ perfect condition....They charged me $150 dollars to restock it. It was a FLOOR model that never even came out of a box!. That has always left a bad taste in my mouth with them.

THanks for the advice goldknight. I will check out the Dewalt elec. impact as I have always been happy with my Dewalt drills and saws.
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post #24 of 47 Old 11-04-2008, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
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I will check out the Dewalt elec. impact as I have always been happy with my Dewalt drills and saws.
I just bought a DeWalt 18v cordless impact (DW059K-2) to replace my cheap Goodyear cordless. The DeWalt claims a whopping 300 lb/ft, comes with two batteries and charger. I have air tools, but it's so much easy to use a cordless for quick jobs rather than starting up the compressor, and of course you can take it with you on the trail.
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post #25 of 47 Old 11-04-2008, 11:05 AM
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I just bought a DeWalt 18v cordless impact (DW059K-2) to replace my cheap Goodyear cordless. The DeWalt claims a whopping 300 lb/ft, comes with two batteries and charger. I have air tools, but it's so much easy to use a cordless for quick jobs rather than starting up the compressor, and of course you can take it with you on the trail.
Have you had a chance to use it? What are your thoughts?

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