Airbag sensors [Archive] - JKowners.com : Jeep Wrangler JK Forum

: Airbag sensors


Jason @ Warrior
10-07-2008, 10:45 AM
I am in the process of installing some XSighting XE7R's into a 2008 Rubicon, and I've run into a slight issue.

The XE7R's have a much larger housing than the factory headlight.

I noticed that before I started modifying the plastic mounts on the Jeep to fit the new headlight that there is an airbag sensor bolted to that plastic mount.

So the question is...how crucial is its location. There is another 6mm bolt that I could relocate it to without changing any wiring and such, and it would still face forward as it did before.

Am I safe to move it. It would be located approximately 2" outward and 1" down from its original location, and would be mounted to metal instead of plastic.

All information is appreciated.

Jason @ Warrior
10-07-2008, 12:20 PM
Well, I found that I could mount them in their original spot, and turn them downward slightly. Anyone think that will be unacceptable to the sensor? I'd hate to fire off the airbags in this thing.

Though I probably would laugh a little afterwards, heh.

Brian
10-07-2008, 05:05 PM
The only problem I see with moving the sensor is any liabilty if you ever get in a wreck. It would not be out of the question for an insurance adjuster to say "The air bags wouldn't have deployed in the stock location." Or that they would have deployed, and caused less personal injury....

You and I both know this is bs, but its hard to prove otherwise in court.

Easy answer, it okay to move it as little as it sounds like you did....long answer.......fill in the blanks...you should never tamper with passive restraint systems...in any way;)

TEEJ
10-07-2008, 06:14 PM
Most air bag sensors are in the passenger compartment, as they measure the deceleration of the vehicle's passengers, and, if the rate would be above a certain threshold, they fire off, to reduce the severity of the deceleration...

IE: The bag slows you down more gently than a steel dash, etc.

If its in the engine bay area, it might be for the stability control for example, as its a similar type of sensor, and is also going to be wired back to the fire wall, etc.

If it IS an airbag sensor, it will be a very interesting find...and VERY useful to know.

If it is to measure the degree of pitch and/or yaw, for comparison to the steering angle and throttle position, etc...then THAT system may have some impact...albeit I'd think what you described would be a small degree of change...assuming it uses momentum/inertia and NOT the attitude of the sensor.

:D

jdrogers
10-07-2008, 08:16 PM
They are airbag sensors. One behind and below each headlight. According to the FSM they work in conjunction with the main airbag controlled under the center console.

If you have side airbags there is a sensor in each B pillar also.

paragon
10-08-2008, 06:36 AM
yep, they are impact sensors and are calibrated to their location. While moving to a small degree might not alter them much, I chose to sell the same lights (I had Xe7r's also) and go a different route because I didn't want to alter the housing to get them to work and move the sensors.

To avoid serious or fatal injury, never strike or drop the front impact sensor, as it can damage the impact sensor or affect its calibration. The front impact sensor enables the system to deploy the front Supplemental Restraint System (SRS) components. If an impact sensor is accidentally dropped during service, the sensor must be scrapped and replaced with a new unit. Failure to observe this warning could result in accidental, incomplete, or improper front SRS component deployment.

Jason @ Warrior
10-08-2008, 07:17 AM
Yeah, I never had any question of what they were. That was established before this thread was made with a quick call to the dealership parts counter. Read off a part # to em and boom problem solved.

I decided to turn them down slightly to clear the lights, should be fine.

TEEJ
10-08-2008, 08:05 AM
Yeah, I never had any question of what they were. That was established before this thread was made with a quick call to the dealership parts counter. Read off a part # to em and boom problem solved.

I decided to turn them down slightly to clear the lights, should be fine.

Good info!

:D

Its probably because they've gone to incremental firing to reduce the force of deployment if possible.

So - do we have a list of ALL the sensor locations?

Is it the headlight areas, the pillars for side units, and in the cabin/dash?

paragon
10-08-2008, 09:06 AM
Here's some stuff about the sensors:
Two front impact sensors are used on this vehicle, one each for the left and right sides of the vehicle. These sensors are mounted remotely from the impact sensor that is internal to the Occupant Restraint Controller (ORC). Each front sensor is secured with a screw to the back of the front end module carrier on either side of the cooling module and inboard of the headlamp within the engine compartment. The sensor housing has an integral connector receptacle, an integral anti-rotation pin, and an integral mounting hole with a metal sleeve to provide crush protection.

Two side impact sensors are used with the optional seat airbags, one each for the left and right sides of the vehicle. These sensors are mounted remotely from the impact sensor that is internal to the Occupant Restraint Controller (ORC). Each side sensor is secured with a nut to a stud on the inner right or left B-pillar within the passenger compartment. The sensor housing has an integral connector receptacle, an integral anti-rotation pin, and an integral mounting hole with a metal sleeve to provide crush protection.

The impact sensors are identical in construction and calibration. A cavity in the center of the molded black plastic impact sensor housing contains the electronic circuitry of the sensor which includes an electronic communication chip and an electronic impact sensor. A nylon cover is laser-welded over the cavity to seal and protect the internal electronic circuitry and components. The impact sensors cannot be repaired or adjusted and, if damaged or ineffective, they must be replaced.

The impact sensors are electronic accelerometers that sense the rate of vehicle deceleration, which provides verification of the direction and severity of an impact. Each sensor also contains an electronic communication chip that allows the unit to communicate the sensor status as well as sensor fault information to the microprocessor in the Occupant Restraint Controller (ORC). The ORC microprocessor continuously monitors all of the passive restraint system electrical circuits to determine the system readiness. If the ORC detects a monitored system fault, it sets a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) and controls the airbag indicator operation accordingly. The impact sensors each receive battery current and ground through dedicated left and right sensor plus and minus circuits from the ORC. The impact sensors and the ORC communicate by modulating the voltage in the sensor plus circuit.

The hard wired circuits between the impact sensors and the ORC may be diagnosed using conventional diagnostic tools and procedures. Refer to the appropriate wiring information. However, conventional diagnostic methods will not prove conclusive in the diagnosis of the impact sensors or the electronic controls or communication between other modules and devices that provide features of the supplemental restraint system. The most reliable, efficient, and accurate means to diagnose the impact sensors or the electronic controls and communication related to impact sensor operation requires the use of a diagnostic scan tool. Refer to the appropriate diagnostic information.

The Occupant Restraint Controller (ORC) is secured with four nuts to four studs on a stamped steel mounting bracket welded onto the top of the floor panel transmission tunnel between the two front seats beneath the floor console and rearward of the transmission gearshift mechanism in the passenger compartment of the vehicle. Concealed within a hollow in the center of the molded plastic ORC housing is the electronic circuitry of the ORC which includes a microprocessor, an electronic impact sensor, an electronic safing sensor, and an energy storage capacitor. A molded plastic end cover plate with a rubber O-ring seal is secured to the open end of the ORC housing with two integral latch features to enclose and protect the internal electronic circuitry and components.